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Dispersal, deprivation and data: asylum seekers and refugees since 1999

Dispersal, deprivation and data: asylum seekers and refugees since 1999
Dispersal, deprivation and data: asylum seekers and refugees since 1999
In 2019, the existing contracts for housing dispersed asylum seekers will come to an end, therefore a new system of asylum accommodation and support is currently being developed. This research investigates the policy of dispersal, which has been implemented in the UK since 2000, by applying rigorous demographic methods and principles to the available data in order to contribute to a better understanding of the asylum settlement process. In particular, it explores the relationships between dispersal, deprivation and individual outcomes in the context of limited data.

Firstly, patterns of dispersal and deprivation are mapped to show the geographic spread of asylum seekers by support status compared to Local Authority deprivation levels, using Home Office Asylum Statistics and the English Indices of Multiple Deprivation. Findings confirm that settlement locations of asylum seekers housed by the government are different from those on subsistence only support, and reflect the policy aim to move settlement away from London. A more formal assessment of these relationships through cluster analysis highlights a distinct group of Local Authorities with high levels of dispersal and high deprivation.Analysis of the Survey of New Refugees identifies statistically significant differences between refugees who were and were not dispersed, but the context of high attrition and increasing time since collection (baseline surveys from 2005-07) limits its use moving forward. A systematic review of the feasibility of combining data on the refugee and asylum seeking population suggests that augmenting existing datasets, by adding an indicator of dispersal, has the potential to greatly increase the number of variables, and therefore the topics, available for analysis. Examples of this are illustrated using the Survey of New Refugees and Annual Population Survey data on reason for migration.
University of Southampton
Nurse, Sarah Louise
06dc9198-7bbc-4e9a-9d06-ff15cb3929ea
Nurse, Sarah Louise
06dc9198-7bbc-4e9a-9d06-ff15cb3929ea
Bijak, Jakub
e33bf9d3-fca6-405f-844c-4b2decf93c66

Nurse, Sarah Louise (2019) Dispersal, deprivation and data: asylum seekers and refugees since 1999. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 171pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

In 2019, the existing contracts for housing dispersed asylum seekers will come to an end, therefore a new system of asylum accommodation and support is currently being developed. This research investigates the policy of dispersal, which has been implemented in the UK since 2000, by applying rigorous demographic methods and principles to the available data in order to contribute to a better understanding of the asylum settlement process. In particular, it explores the relationships between dispersal, deprivation and individual outcomes in the context of limited data.

Firstly, patterns of dispersal and deprivation are mapped to show the geographic spread of asylum seekers by support status compared to Local Authority deprivation levels, using Home Office Asylum Statistics and the English Indices of Multiple Deprivation. Findings confirm that settlement locations of asylum seekers housed by the government are different from those on subsistence only support, and reflect the policy aim to move settlement away from London. A more formal assessment of these relationships through cluster analysis highlights a distinct group of Local Authorities with high levels of dispersal and high deprivation.Analysis of the Survey of New Refugees identifies statistically significant differences between refugees who were and were not dispersed, but the context of high attrition and increasing time since collection (baseline surveys from 2005-07) limits its use moving forward. A systematic review of the feasibility of combining data on the refugee and asylum seeking population suggests that augmenting existing datasets, by adding an indicator of dispersal, has the potential to greatly increase the number of variables, and therefore the topics, available for analysis. Examples of this are illustrated using the Survey of New Refugees and Annual Population Survey data on reason for migration.

Text
Sarah Nurse PhD Thesis_Final - Version of Record
Restricted to Repository staff only until 7 May 2021.
Available under License University of Southampton Thesis Licence.

More information

Published date: January 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 433127
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/433127
PURE UUID: f51fba4a-68fd-479d-b6ee-2d4b3fd3b5a8
ORCID for Jakub Bijak: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2563-5040

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 08 Aug 2019 16:30
Last modified: 25 Oct 2019 00:34

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Contributors

Author: Sarah Louise Nurse
Thesis advisor: Jakub Bijak ORCID iD

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