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The apparent resilience of the Dry Tropical Forests of the Nicaraguan region of the Central American Dry Corridor to variations in climate over the last c. 1200 years

The apparent resilience of the Dry Tropical Forests of the Nicaraguan region of the Central American Dry Corridor to variations in climate over the last c. 1200 years
The apparent resilience of the Dry Tropical Forests of the Nicaraguan region of the Central American Dry Corridor to variations in climate over the last c. 1200 years
The Central American Dry Corridor (CADC) is the most densely populated area of the Central American Isthmus and is subject to the greatest variability in precipitation between seasons. The vegetation of this region is composed of Dry Tropical Forests (DTF), which are suggested to be highly susceptible to variations in climate and anthropogenic development. This study examines the vulnerability of past DTF surrounding the Asese peninsula, Nicaragua to climatic and anthropogenic disturbances over the past c. 1200 years. Past vegetation, climate, burning, and animal abundance were reconstructed using proxy analysis of fossil pollen, diatoms, macroscopic charcoal, and Sporormiella. Results from this research suggest that DTF have been highly resilient to past climatic and anthropogenic perturbations. Changes in DTF structure and composition appear to be linked to the abundance and intensity of fire. Pre-Columbian anthropogenic impacts on DTF are not detected in the record; however, DTF taxa decline slightly after European contact (1522 C.E.). Overall the DTF for the Nicaraguan region of the CADC were found to be highly resilient to both climatic and anthropogenic disturbances, suggesting that this region will continue to be resilient in the face of future population expansion and climatic variation.
2571-550X
Harvey, William
73e4038d-354f-4fd2-ac60-614c57e7bf14
Stansell, Nathan
b3044f0b-1f4a-49ca-a53e-4b6464d6851b
Nogué, Sandra
5b464cff-a158-481f-8b7f-647c93d7a034
Willis, Kathy
5a442cde-a2dc-4046-be36-c00017fd47db
Harvey, William
73e4038d-354f-4fd2-ac60-614c57e7bf14
Stansell, Nathan
b3044f0b-1f4a-49ca-a53e-4b6464d6851b
Nogué, Sandra
5b464cff-a158-481f-8b7f-647c93d7a034
Willis, Kathy
5a442cde-a2dc-4046-be36-c00017fd47db

Harvey, William, Stansell, Nathan, Nogué, Sandra and Willis, Kathy (2019) The apparent resilience of the Dry Tropical Forests of the Nicaraguan region of the Central American Dry Corridor to variations in climate over the last c. 1200 years. Quaternary, 2 (3), [25]. (doi:10.3390/quat2030025).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The Central American Dry Corridor (CADC) is the most densely populated area of the Central American Isthmus and is subject to the greatest variability in precipitation between seasons. The vegetation of this region is composed of Dry Tropical Forests (DTF), which are suggested to be highly susceptible to variations in climate and anthropogenic development. This study examines the vulnerability of past DTF surrounding the Asese peninsula, Nicaragua to climatic and anthropogenic disturbances over the past c. 1200 years. Past vegetation, climate, burning, and animal abundance were reconstructed using proxy analysis of fossil pollen, diatoms, macroscopic charcoal, and Sporormiella. Results from this research suggest that DTF have been highly resilient to past climatic and anthropogenic perturbations. Changes in DTF structure and composition appear to be linked to the abundance and intensity of fire. Pre-Columbian anthropogenic impacts on DTF are not detected in the record; however, DTF taxa decline slightly after European contact (1522 C.E.). Overall the DTF for the Nicaraguan region of the CADC were found to be highly resilient to both climatic and anthropogenic disturbances, suggesting that this region will continue to be resilient in the face of future population expansion and climatic variation.

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quaternary-02-00025 - Version of Record
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Accepted/In Press date: 11 July 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 18 July 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 433162
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/433162
ISSN: 2571-550X
PURE UUID: bf2be8eb-e533-4d20-ae0e-f435fe459103
ORCID for Sandra Nogué: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0093-4252

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Date deposited: 09 Aug 2019 16:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 03:04

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Contributors

Author: William Harvey
Author: Nathan Stansell
Author: Sandra Nogué ORCID iD
Author: Kathy Willis

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