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Evidence based approaches to the application of precautionary allergen labelling: Report from two iFAAM workshops

Evidence based approaches to the application of precautionary allergen labelling: Report from two iFAAM workshops
Evidence based approaches to the application of precautionary allergen labelling: Report from two iFAAM workshops

Food allergy is a major public health concern with avoidance of the trigger food(s) being central to management by the patient. Food information legislation mandates the declaration of allergenic ingredients; however, the labelling of the unintentional presence of allergens is less defined. Precautionary allergen labelling (PAL) was introduced by the food industry to help manage and communicate the risk of reaction from the unintended presence of allergens in foods. In its current form, PAL is counterproductive for consumers with food allergies as there is no standardised approach to applying PAL. Foods with a PAL often do not contain the identified food allergen while some products without a PAL contain quantities of common food allergens that are capable of inducing an allergic reaction. Integrated Approaches to Food Allergen and Allergy Risk Management (iFAAM) was an EU-funded project that aimed to improve the management of food allergens by the food industry for the benefit of people with food allergies. Within iFAAM, a clinically validated tiered risk assessment approach for food allergens was developed. Two cross-stakeholder iFAAM workshops were held on 13th -14th December 2016 and 19th -20th April 2018. One of the objectives of these workshops was to develop a proposal to make PAL effective for consumers. This paper describes the outcomes from these workshops. This provides the basis for the development of more informative and transparent labelling that will ultimately improve management and well-being in consumers with food allergy. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

0954-7894
1191-1200
DunnGalvin, Audrey
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Roberts, Graham
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Schnadt, Sabine
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Astley, Siân
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Austin, Moira
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Blom, W. Marty
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Baumert, Joseph
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Chan, Chun-Han
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Crevel, René W.R.
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Grimshaw, Kate E.C.
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Kruizinga, Astrid G.
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Regent, Lynne
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Taylor, Stephen
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Walker, Michael
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Mills, Clare
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DunnGalvin, Audrey
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Roberts, Graham
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Schnadt, Sabine
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Astley, Siân
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Austin, Moira
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Blom, W. Marty
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Baumert, Joseph
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Chan, Chun-Han
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Crevel, René W.R.
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Grimshaw, Kate E.C.
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Kruizinga, Astrid G.
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Regent, Lynne
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Taylor, Stephen
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Walker, Michael
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Mills, Clare
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DunnGalvin, Audrey, Roberts, Graham, Schnadt, Sabine, Astley, Siân, Austin, Moira, Blom, W. Marty, Baumert, Joseph, Chan, Chun-Han, Crevel, René W.R., Grimshaw, Kate E.C., Kruizinga, Astrid G., Regent, Lynne, Taylor, Stephen, Walker, Michael and Mills, Clare (2019) Evidence based approaches to the application of precautionary allergen labelling: Report from two iFAAM workshops. Clinical & Experimental Allergy, 49 (4), 1191-1200. (doi:10.1111/cea.13464).

Record type: Letter

Abstract

Food allergy is a major public health concern with avoidance of the trigger food(s) being central to management by the patient. Food information legislation mandates the declaration of allergenic ingredients; however, the labelling of the unintentional presence of allergens is less defined. Precautionary allergen labelling (PAL) was introduced by the food industry to help manage and communicate the risk of reaction from the unintended presence of allergens in foods. In its current form, PAL is counterproductive for consumers with food allergies as there is no standardised approach to applying PAL. Foods with a PAL often do not contain the identified food allergen while some products without a PAL contain quantities of common food allergens that are capable of inducing an allergic reaction. Integrated Approaches to Food Allergen and Allergy Risk Management (iFAAM) was an EU-funded project that aimed to improve the management of food allergens by the food industry for the benefit of people with food allergies. Within iFAAM, a clinically validated tiered risk assessment approach for food allergens was developed. Two cross-stakeholder iFAAM workshops were held on 13th -14th December 2016 and 19th -20th April 2018. One of the objectives of these workshops was to develop a proposal to make PAL effective for consumers. This paper describes the outcomes from these workshops. This provides the basis for the development of more informative and transparent labelling that will ultimately improve management and well-being in consumers with food allergy. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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DunnGalvin_et_al-2019-Clinical_&_Experimental_Allergy - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 5 July 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 20 July 2019
Published date: September 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 433169
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/433169
ISSN: 0954-7894
PURE UUID: 107f5c19-f2c4-4577-9b17-e58abe30bd59
ORCID for Graham Roberts: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2252-1248

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Aug 2019 16:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 06:30

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Contributors

Author: Audrey DunnGalvin
Author: Graham Roberts ORCID iD
Author: Sabine Schnadt
Author: Siân Astley
Author: Moira Austin
Author: W. Marty Blom
Author: Joseph Baumert
Author: Chun-Han Chan
Author: René W.R. Crevel
Author: Kate E.C. Grimshaw
Author: Astrid G. Kruizinga
Author: Lynne Regent
Author: Stephen Taylor
Author: Michael Walker
Author: Clare Mills

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