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Transition from university to work: Social experiences and perceptions of British South Asian women in higher education

Transition from university to work: Social experiences and perceptions of British South Asian women in higher education
Transition from university to work: Social experiences and perceptions of British South Asian women in higher education
Much of the earlier literature found on the lives of British South Asian women is merged within their familial and traditional roles, and limited attention is being paid to their educational and professional prospects. This study examines how ethnicity, gender and social class issues interrelate in the social experiences of South Asian women in Higher Education. Exploring the perceptions of these women is paramount to understand how the interplay between these constructs impacts their educational trajectories and shape their expectation of transition to work. By drawing upon Bourdieu’s conceptual tools- Habitus, Capital and Field, the researcher has theoretically and empirically linked how one’s individual experiences and social position, opportunities and challenges shape the expectation of subjective dimension of their experiences and the ability to pursue these expectations.

This ethnographic study explored the social experiences of twelve British South Asian women studying in a range of universities around South East of England as they relate to their evolving experiences within a raced, classed and gendered world. Data analysis is informed by thematic analysis of semi-structured interviews, participant observation and fieldnotes. The key findings demonstrate that young women’s perceptions of transition to work are situated within the complex structures in their families, communities and mainstream society. As these women enter new social spaces of higher education and employment, increased independence leads them to re-assess their familial, cultural and religious assertions and their relationships within it. Based on the evidence gathered, the study argues that through negotiations and individual strategies, these women have at least to a certain extent, availed some degree of control over their circumstances. This study suggests that the younger generation of British South Asian women are changing their social positions from being traditional and dependent to independent and self-directed individuals both within their families and communities and in mainstream society.
University of Southampton
Khawaja, Laila
6cc4c980-6e05-44db-8040-3de313f26fd7
Khawaja, Laila
6cc4c980-6e05-44db-8040-3de313f26fd7
Downey, Christopher
bb95b259-2e31-401b-8edf-78e8d76bfb8c

Khawaja, Laila (2019) Transition from university to work: Social experiences and perceptions of British South Asian women in higher education. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 281pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Much of the earlier literature found on the lives of British South Asian women is merged within their familial and traditional roles, and limited attention is being paid to their educational and professional prospects. This study examines how ethnicity, gender and social class issues interrelate in the social experiences of South Asian women in Higher Education. Exploring the perceptions of these women is paramount to understand how the interplay between these constructs impacts their educational trajectories and shape their expectation of transition to work. By drawing upon Bourdieu’s conceptual tools- Habitus, Capital and Field, the researcher has theoretically and empirically linked how one’s individual experiences and social position, opportunities and challenges shape the expectation of subjective dimension of their experiences and the ability to pursue these expectations.

This ethnographic study explored the social experiences of twelve British South Asian women studying in a range of universities around South East of England as they relate to their evolving experiences within a raced, classed and gendered world. Data analysis is informed by thematic analysis of semi-structured interviews, participant observation and fieldnotes. The key findings demonstrate that young women’s perceptions of transition to work are situated within the complex structures in their families, communities and mainstream society. As these women enter new social spaces of higher education and employment, increased independence leads them to re-assess their familial, cultural and religious assertions and their relationships within it. Based on the evidence gathered, the study argues that through negotiations and individual strategies, these women have at least to a certain extent, availed some degree of control over their circumstances. This study suggests that the younger generation of British South Asian women are changing their social positions from being traditional and dependent to independent and self-directed individuals both within their families and communities and in mainstream society.

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1. Final Thesis -LKhawaja- 062019 - Version of Record
Available under License University of Southampton Thesis Licence.
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Published date: June 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 433189
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/433189
PURE UUID: e4f28574-b4a3-4660-aa9d-7fbfd6ec6254
ORCID for Christopher Downey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6094-0534

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Aug 2019 16:30
Last modified: 10 Aug 2019 00:34

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