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Preterm birth: a narrative review of the current evidence on nutritional and bioactive solutions for risk reduction

Preterm birth: a narrative review of the current evidence on nutritional and bioactive solutions for risk reduction
Preterm birth: a narrative review of the current evidence on nutritional and bioactive solutions for risk reduction
Preterm birth (PTB) (<37 weeks of gestation) is the leading cause of newborn death and a risk factor for short and long-term adverse health outcomes. Most cases are of unknown cause. Although the mechanisms triggering PTB remain unclear, an inappropriate increase in net inflammatory load seems to be key. To date, interventions that reduce the risk of PTB are effective only in specific groups of women, probably due to the heterogeneity of its etiopathogenesis. Use of progesterone is the most effective, but only in singleton pregnancies with history of PTB. Thus, primary prevention is greatly needed and nutritional and bioactive solutions are a promising alternative. Among these, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is the most promising to reduce the risk for early PTB. Other potential nutrient interventions include the administration of zinc (possibly limited to populations with low nutritional status or poor zinc status) and vitamin D; additional preliminary evidence exists for vitamin A, calcium, iron, folic acid, combined iron-folate, magnesium, multiple micronutrients, and probiotics. Considering the public health relevance of PTB, promising interventions should be studied in large and well-designed clinical trials. The objective of this review is to describe, summarize, and discuss the existing evidence on nutritional and bioactive solutions for reducing the risk of PTB.
1-26
Samuel, Tinu M.
62c69557-106b-45fb-87d9-509100e44ace
Sakwinska, Olga
aa247f71-f435-4a07-81d0-468745037d34
Makinen, Kimmo
885ea046-9f85-4763-95da-bd5bdfe35064
Burdge, Graham C.
09d60a07-8ca1-4351-9bf1-de6ffcfb2159
Godfrey, Keith M.
0931701e-fe2c-44b5-8f0d-ec5c7477a6fd
Silva Zolezzi, Irma
69884672-6f03-41cc-9d96-fb5d8e78faa0
Samuel, Tinu M.
62c69557-106b-45fb-87d9-509100e44ace
Sakwinska, Olga
aa247f71-f435-4a07-81d0-468745037d34
Makinen, Kimmo
885ea046-9f85-4763-95da-bd5bdfe35064
Burdge, Graham C.
09d60a07-8ca1-4351-9bf1-de6ffcfb2159
Godfrey, Keith M.
0931701e-fe2c-44b5-8f0d-ec5c7477a6fd
Silva Zolezzi, Irma
69884672-6f03-41cc-9d96-fb5d8e78faa0

Samuel, Tinu M., Sakwinska, Olga, Makinen, Kimmo, Burdge, Graham C., Godfrey, Keith M. and Silva Zolezzi, Irma (2019) Preterm birth: a narrative review of the current evidence on nutritional and bioactive solutions for risk reduction. Nutrients, 11 (8), 1-26, [E1811]. (doi:10.3390/nu11081811).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Preterm birth (PTB) (<37 weeks of gestation) is the leading cause of newborn death and a risk factor for short and long-term adverse health outcomes. Most cases are of unknown cause. Although the mechanisms triggering PTB remain unclear, an inappropriate increase in net inflammatory load seems to be key. To date, interventions that reduce the risk of PTB are effective only in specific groups of women, probably due to the heterogeneity of its etiopathogenesis. Use of progesterone is the most effective, but only in singleton pregnancies with history of PTB. Thus, primary prevention is greatly needed and nutritional and bioactive solutions are a promising alternative. Among these, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is the most promising to reduce the risk for early PTB. Other potential nutrient interventions include the administration of zinc (possibly limited to populations with low nutritional status or poor zinc status) and vitamin D; additional preliminary evidence exists for vitamin A, calcium, iron, folic acid, combined iron-folate, magnesium, multiple micronutrients, and probiotics. Considering the public health relevance of PTB, promising interventions should be studied in large and well-designed clinical trials. The objective of this review is to describe, summarize, and discuss the existing evidence on nutritional and bioactive solutions for reducing the risk of PTB.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 2 August 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 6 August 2019
Published date: August 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 433217
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/433217
PURE UUID: 09e4e1da-6b3f-4dcc-806d-0af21820c31e
ORCID for Graham C. Burdge: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7665-2967
ORCID for Keith M. Godfrey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4643-0618

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 12 Aug 2019 16:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 02:35

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Contributors

Author: Tinu M. Samuel
Author: Olga Sakwinska
Author: Kimmo Makinen
Author: Irma Silva Zolezzi

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