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The morphological evolution and the sustainability of deltas in the 21st Century

The morphological evolution and the sustainability of deltas in the 21st Century
The morphological evolution and the sustainability of deltas in the 21st Century
Utilising the cellular automata model CAESAR-Lisflood, a novel set of metrics is developed to explore the nature of multidecadal morphological change in delta catchment systems under a range of climatic and environmental change scenarios. Whilst this study has a specific focus on the Mahanadi Delta in India,these scenarios are designed in such a way so as to encapsulate stressors that are common to a broad range of deltaic environments; including increased exposure to meteorological extremes, sediment starvation and eustatic sea-level rise.

Compared to terrestrial systems, there have been relatively few studies that focus on the successful simulation of long-term emergent phenomena in coastal catchments, especially in the specific context of deltas. To address this gap, this research aims to enhance our understanding of how emergent processes influence the multidecadal evolution of deltaic environments, and how we can use this information to understand how the system may respond to increasing conditions of climatic stress.

This study also seeks to explore how changes in the emergent morphological system may impact certain factors that influence the habitability of the Mahanadi Delta. Through the development of a novel vulnerability index, this study explores: (1) the impacts of an extreme flood event; (2) potential changes in habitat cover; (3) the effectiveness of the model to explore engineering strategies, with a focus on re-naturalising the delta.
University of Southampton
Spinney, Sarah, Jane
89d6cf27-0457-4815-a004-c2a3127d68e1
Spinney, Sarah, Jane
89d6cf27-0457-4815-a004-c2a3127d68e1
Darby, Stephen
4c3e1c76-d404-4ff3-86f8-84e42fbb7970
Dearing, John
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Spinney, Sarah, Jane (2019) The morphological evolution and the sustainability of deltas in the 21st Century. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 391pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Utilising the cellular automata model CAESAR-Lisflood, a novel set of metrics is developed to explore the nature of multidecadal morphological change in delta catchment systems under a range of climatic and environmental change scenarios. Whilst this study has a specific focus on the Mahanadi Delta in India,these scenarios are designed in such a way so as to encapsulate stressors that are common to a broad range of deltaic environments; including increased exposure to meteorological extremes, sediment starvation and eustatic sea-level rise.

Compared to terrestrial systems, there have been relatively few studies that focus on the successful simulation of long-term emergent phenomena in coastal catchments, especially in the specific context of deltas. To address this gap, this research aims to enhance our understanding of how emergent processes influence the multidecadal evolution of deltaic environments, and how we can use this information to understand how the system may respond to increasing conditions of climatic stress.

This study also seeks to explore how changes in the emergent morphological system may impact certain factors that influence the habitability of the Mahanadi Delta. Through the development of a novel vulnerability index, this study explores: (1) the impacts of an extreme flood event; (2) potential changes in habitat cover; (3) the effectiveness of the model to explore engineering strategies, with a focus on re-naturalising the delta.

Text
Sarah Spinney PhD thesis final copy - Version of Record
Available under License University of Southampton Thesis Licence.
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More information

Published date: April 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 433264
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/433264
PURE UUID: c641d891-d1f6-4f69-9573-36f6b75a24e9
ORCID for Stephen Darby: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8778-4394
ORCID for John Dearing: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1466-9640

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 12 Aug 2019 16:30
Last modified: 22 Nov 2021 02:51

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Contributors

Author: Sarah, Jane Spinney
Thesis advisor: Stephen Darby ORCID iD
Thesis advisor: John Dearing ORCID iD

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