The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Developing a sustainable second-hand clothing tracer in Ghana

Developing a sustainable second-hand clothing tracer in Ghana
Developing a sustainable second-hand clothing tracer in Ghana
Ghana is flooded by the excessive importation of low-grade second-hand clothes (SHC) from America, Europe and Asia. The second-hand clothing trade, which is mainly undertaken in the Kantamanto market within the central business district of Accra, Ghana is unsustainable. This situation has not been given significant attention by successive governments, state agencies and city officials making it an under researched area. 
This research aims to develop a conceptual understanding of a sustainable second-hand clothing trade based on the integration of the three essential dimensions that traverse sustainable development; (economic, environmental and social). The sustainable developments of the second-hand clothing trade hinges on effective regulation and reuse and recycling systems (a Three-R framework) to advance the economic growth of the trade, and to promote healthy commercial environments and the social well-being of both traders and consumers. The research critically examines theories on sustainable development, waste management hierarchy, development of the second-hand clothing trade and contemporary global second-hand clothing trade practices to create a conceptual framework for the sustainable development of the second-hand clothing trade in Ghana. 
The research employs a qualitative approach for collecting data through semi-structured interviews and participant observations from the Waste & Resources Action Programme (WRAP) U.K., the Textiles Recycling Association (TRA) U.K., the Kantamanto Used Clothes Sellers Association in Ghana, the Accra Metropolitan Assembly (AMA), the Ministry of Trade and Industry (MOTI), the Ghana Standards Authority (GSA), the Ministry of Railways Development, and the second-hand clothing importers, wholesalers, retailers and consumers within the Kantamanto market in Accra, Ghana. The emergent themes from the empirical data were categorised in accordance with the research questions and literature reviewed, and constantly analysed using comparisons and reliability checks. The research contributes to knowledge by presenting a conceptual framework that bridges the existing gap in the sustainable development of the Ghanaian second-hand clothing trade.
University of Southampton
Amanor, Kenneth
1ac58d0a-cb61-4b7c-951a-f9f6c824d537
Amanor, Kenneth
1ac58d0a-cb61-4b7c-951a-f9f6c824d537
Faiers, Jonathan
6d0c4db1-8d10-48c4-875e-4e60b94f300d
Hopkins, John
5634f526-ca2f-4d13-9ad9-0185037ef625

Amanor, Kenneth (2018) Developing a sustainable second-hand clothing tracer in Ghana. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 345pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Ghana is flooded by the excessive importation of low-grade second-hand clothes (SHC) from America, Europe and Asia. The second-hand clothing trade, which is mainly undertaken in the Kantamanto market within the central business district of Accra, Ghana is unsustainable. This situation has not been given significant attention by successive governments, state agencies and city officials making it an under researched area. 
This research aims to develop a conceptual understanding of a sustainable second-hand clothing trade based on the integration of the three essential dimensions that traverse sustainable development; (economic, environmental and social). The sustainable developments of the second-hand clothing trade hinges on effective regulation and reuse and recycling systems (a Three-R framework) to advance the economic growth of the trade, and to promote healthy commercial environments and the social well-being of both traders and consumers. The research critically examines theories on sustainable development, waste management hierarchy, development of the second-hand clothing trade and contemporary global second-hand clothing trade practices to create a conceptual framework for the sustainable development of the second-hand clothing trade in Ghana. 
The research employs a qualitative approach for collecting data through semi-structured interviews and participant observations from the Waste & Resources Action Programme (WRAP) U.K., the Textiles Recycling Association (TRA) U.K., the Kantamanto Used Clothes Sellers Association in Ghana, the Accra Metropolitan Assembly (AMA), the Ministry of Trade and Industry (MOTI), the Ghana Standards Authority (GSA), the Ministry of Railways Development, and the second-hand clothing importers, wholesalers, retailers and consumers within the Kantamanto market in Accra, Ghana. The emergent themes from the empirical data were categorised in accordance with the research questions and literature reviewed, and constantly analysed using comparisons and reliability checks. The research contributes to knowledge by presenting a conceptual framework that bridges the existing gap in the sustainable development of the Ghanaian second-hand clothing trade.

Text
KENNETH AMANOR PHD THESIS - Version of Record
Available under License University of Southampton Thesis Licence.
Download (5MB)

More information

Published date: September 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 433269
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/433269
PURE UUID: 9ede4e67-0615-49bf-bf37-7b9ad8df4814

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 12 Aug 2019 16:30
Last modified: 12 Aug 2019 16:30

Export record

Contributors

Author: Kenneth Amanor
Thesis advisor: Jonathan Faiers
Thesis advisor: John Hopkins

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×