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Seeing potential is more important than usability: revisiting technology acceptance

Seeing potential is more important than usability: revisiting technology acceptance
Seeing potential is more important than usability: revisiting technology acceptance
With ever-increasing technology complexity, there is a need to consider how technology integrates within typical and specific environments. Empirical work with technology acceptance models has to date focused largely on perceived or expected ease-of-use along with the perceived or expected usefulness of the technology. These constructs have been examined extensively via quantitative methods. Other factors have received less attention. There is some evidence, for instance, that technology adoption may depend on how technology contributes to self-efficacy and agency. Less accessible perhaps to standarquantitative instruments, it is time to consider a mixed-methods approach to ex-amine these aspects of technology acceptance. For this exploratory study, we have begun to evaluate a security modeller tool within a healthcare. We asked IT professionals working in hospital environments in Italy and Spain to work with the technology as part of a limited ethnographic study, and to complete a standard ease-of-use questionnaire. Comparing the results, we found that the quantitative measures to be poor predictors of a willingness to explore the affordances presented by the technology. Although limited at this time, we maintain that a more nuanced picture of technology adoption must allow potential adopters to be creative in response to how they believe the technology could be exploited in their environment.
Technology acceptance, User expectation, Mixed-methods, System Usability Score, Ethnography, Technology affordance, Self-efficacy, Agency
238-249
Springer
Pickering, Brian
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Surridge, Michael
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Nouri Janian, Mariet
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Lòpez Moreno, Borja
c3c5fedc-5a72-457e-9bad-0128b3ed213c
Micheletti, Andrea
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Sanno, Alberto
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Marcus, Aaron
Wang, Wentao
Pickering, Brian
225088d0-729e-4f17-afe2-1ad1193ccae6
Surridge, Michael
3bd360fa-1962-4992-bb16-12fc4dd7d9a9
Nouri Janian, Mariet
5f0f4303-1fad-451d-be9a-94efa2d7b27d
Lòpez Moreno, Borja
c3c5fedc-5a72-457e-9bad-0128b3ed213c
Micheletti, Andrea
4a274ee1-858a-4d64-9381-bca2df5794f0
Sanno, Alberto
1adef5a3-274c-4b8f-98e8-8db409271028
Marcus, Aaron
Wang, Wentao

Pickering, Brian, Surridge, Michael, Nouri Janian, Mariet, Lòpez Moreno, Borja, Micheletti, Andrea and Sanno, Alberto (2019) Seeing potential is more important than usability: revisiting technology acceptance. Marcus, Aaron and Wang, Wentao (eds.) In Design, User Experience, and Usability. Practice and Case Studies. HCII 2019. vol. 11586, Springer. pp. 238-249 . (doi:10.1007/978-3-030-23535-2_18).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

With ever-increasing technology complexity, there is a need to consider how technology integrates within typical and specific environments. Empirical work with technology acceptance models has to date focused largely on perceived or expected ease-of-use along with the perceived or expected usefulness of the technology. These constructs have been examined extensively via quantitative methods. Other factors have received less attention. There is some evidence, for instance, that technology adoption may depend on how technology contributes to self-efficacy and agency. Less accessible perhaps to standarquantitative instruments, it is time to consider a mixed-methods approach to ex-amine these aspects of technology acceptance. For this exploratory study, we have begun to evaluate a security modeller tool within a healthcare. We asked IT professionals working in hospital environments in Italy and Spain to work with the technology as part of a limited ethnographic study, and to complete a standard ease-of-use questionnaire. Comparing the results, we found that the quantitative measures to be poor predictors of a willingness to explore the affordances presented by the technology. Although limited at this time, we maintain that a more nuanced picture of technology adoption must allow potential adopters to be creative in response to how they believe the technology could be exploited in their environment.

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Seeing Potential Is More Important Than Usability Revisiting Technology Acceptance - Accepted Manuscript
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e-pub ahead of print date: 4 July 2019
Keywords: Technology acceptance, User expectation, Mixed-methods, System Usability Score, Ethnography, Technology affordance, Self-efficacy, Agency

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 433300
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/433300
PURE UUID: 438862d8-0458-4545-a078-e8ce64dae47b
ORCID for Brian Pickering: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6815-2938

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Date deposited: 13 Aug 2019 16:30
Last modified: 29 Aug 2019 00:37

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Contributors

Author: Brian Pickering ORCID iD
Author: Michael Surridge
Author: Mariet Nouri Janian
Author: Borja Lòpez Moreno
Author: Andrea Micheletti
Author: Alberto Sanno
Editor: Aaron Marcus
Editor: Wentao Wang

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