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Mindfulness and contemplative approaches in education

Mindfulness and contemplative approaches in education
Mindfulness and contemplative approaches in education

There is a growing and promising quantitative evidence base on mindfulness in schools, which has continued to emerge over the last two years and which consistently suggests small to moderate impacts across a range of outcomes, most strongly and reliably on psycho-social health and well-being, especially mental health problems, with less definitive but promising evidence for small effects on behaviour, cognition, learning, and physical health. The overlapping field of ‘contemplative education’ is less concerned with measurable outcomes, aiming instead to put the learner, and their self-reflective mindfulness at the heart of the teaching and learning process. Interest is growing on how best to implement mindfulness and integrate it into the policies, practice and ethos of the whole institution, with some promising early findings, mainly from qualitative data. There is a particular and growing emphasis, supported by some emerging quantitative evidence, on the need for teachers to learn mindfulness themselves and establish their own practice if they are to cultivate mindfulness in schools effectively.

2352-250X
321-326
Weare, Katherine
84c8e484-ab17-4037-a0bd-858a0293826d
Weare, Katherine
84c8e484-ab17-4037-a0bd-858a0293826d

Weare, Katherine (2019) Mindfulness and contemplative approaches in education. Current Opinion in Psychology, 28, 321-326. (doi:10.1016/j.copsyc.2019.06.001).

Record type: Review

Abstract

There is a growing and promising quantitative evidence base on mindfulness in schools, which has continued to emerge over the last two years and which consistently suggests small to moderate impacts across a range of outcomes, most strongly and reliably on psycho-social health and well-being, especially mental health problems, with less definitive but promising evidence for small effects on behaviour, cognition, learning, and physical health. The overlapping field of ‘contemplative education’ is less concerned with measurable outcomes, aiming instead to put the learner, and their self-reflective mindfulness at the heart of the teaching and learning process. Interest is growing on how best to implement mindfulness and integrate it into the policies, practice and ethos of the whole institution, with some promising early findings, mainly from qualitative data. There is a particular and growing emphasis, supported by some emerging quantitative evidence, on the need for teachers to learn mindfulness themselves and establish their own practice if they are to cultivate mindfulness in schools effectively.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 14 June 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 433399
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/433399
ISSN: 2352-250X
PURE UUID: a0c468ec-0801-4df6-acdf-ba44148500e9

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 20 Aug 2019 16:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 00:04

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