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Experimental implementation of a nonlinear feedback controller for a stroke limited inertial actuator

Experimental implementation of a nonlinear feedback controller for a stroke limited inertial actuator
Experimental implementation of a nonlinear feedback controller for a stroke limited inertial actuator

This research consists of theoretical and experimental studies of a stroke limited inertial, or proof mass, actuator used in active vibration control. Traditionally, inertial actuators are used with velocity feedback controllers to reduce structural vibrations. However, physical limits, such as stroke saturation, can affect the behaviour and the stability of the control system. In fact, stroke saturation results in impulse like excitations, which are transmitted to the structure that is liable to damage. Moreover, the shocks produced by the impacts are in phase with the velocity of the structure. This produces an input force, which reduces the overall damping and eventually leads to limit cycle oscillations and the instability of the system. This paper examines the experimental implementation of a nonlinear feedback controller to avoid collisions of the proof mass with the actuator’s end stops, hence preventing the instability of the system due to stroke saturation. Firstly, the nonlinear behaviour of the stroke limited inertial actuator is reported. This allows identifying the stroke length of the proof mass. Secondly, the nonlinear feedback controller is presented, which acts as a second loop alongside the velocity feedback control loop. The main purpose of the nonlinear feedback controller is to increase the damping of the actuator when the poof mass gets close to the end stops. Finally, the experimental implementation of the nonlinear controller is investigated and a comparison in terms of performance and stability of the control system is made when both the feedback loops or only the velocity feedback loop are present.

Inertial actuator, Limit cycle oscillations, Nonlinear feedback, Stroke saturation, Velocity feedback
163-177
Springer New York
Dal Borgo, M.
7eeac32d-7dc9-4645-89cc-acee5a293867
Ghandchi Tehrani, M.
c2251e5b-a029-46e2-b585-422120a7bc44
Elliott, S. J.
721dc55c-8c3e-4895-b9c4-82f62abd3567
Niezrecki, Christopher
Baqersad, Javad
Dal Borgo, M.
7eeac32d-7dc9-4645-89cc-acee5a293867
Ghandchi Tehrani, M.
c2251e5b-a029-46e2-b585-422120a7bc44
Elliott, S. J.
721dc55c-8c3e-4895-b9c4-82f62abd3567
Niezrecki, Christopher
Baqersad, Javad

Dal Borgo, M., Ghandchi Tehrani, M. and Elliott, S. J. (2018) Experimental implementation of a nonlinear feedback controller for a stroke limited inertial actuator. Niezrecki, Christopher and Baqersad, Javad (eds.) In Structural Health Monitoring, Photogrammetry and DIC, Volume 6 - Proceedings of the 36th IMAC, A Conference and Exposition on Structural Dynamics 2018. vol. 6, Springer New York. pp. 163-177 . (doi:10.1007/978-3-319-74476-6_22).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

This research consists of theoretical and experimental studies of a stroke limited inertial, or proof mass, actuator used in active vibration control. Traditionally, inertial actuators are used with velocity feedback controllers to reduce structural vibrations. However, physical limits, such as stroke saturation, can affect the behaviour and the stability of the control system. In fact, stroke saturation results in impulse like excitations, which are transmitted to the structure that is liable to damage. Moreover, the shocks produced by the impacts are in phase with the velocity of the structure. This produces an input force, which reduces the overall damping and eventually leads to limit cycle oscillations and the instability of the system. This paper examines the experimental implementation of a nonlinear feedback controller to avoid collisions of the proof mass with the actuator’s end stops, hence preventing the instability of the system due to stroke saturation. Firstly, the nonlinear behaviour of the stroke limited inertial actuator is reported. This allows identifying the stroke length of the proof mass. Secondly, the nonlinear feedback controller is presented, which acts as a second loop alongside the velocity feedback control loop. The main purpose of the nonlinear feedback controller is to increase the damping of the actuator when the poof mass gets close to the end stops. Finally, the experimental implementation of the nonlinear controller is investigated and a comparison in terms of performance and stability of the control system is made when both the feedback loops or only the velocity feedback loop are present.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 30 May 2018
Venue - Dates: 36th IMAC, A Conference and Exposition on Structural Dynamics, 2018, Orlando, United States, 2018-02-12 - 2018-02-15
Keywords: Inertial actuator, Limit cycle oscillations, Nonlinear feedback, Stroke saturation, Velocity feedback

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 433416
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/433416
PURE UUID: 8aad7bb7-3e00-4f02-889a-87b1cc8613b1
ORCID for M. Dal Borgo: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4263-0513

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Aug 2019 16:30
Last modified: 21 Sep 2019 00:30

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Contributors

Author: M. Dal Borgo ORCID iD
Author: S. J. Elliott
Editor: Christopher Niezrecki
Editor: Javad Baqersad

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