The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Coronary heart disease, hypertension and use of biomass fuel among women: Comparative cross-sectional study

Coronary heart disease, hypertension and use of biomass fuel among women: Comparative cross-sectional study
Coronary heart disease, hypertension and use of biomass fuel among women: Comparative cross-sectional study

Objectives: To explore the associations of hypertension and coronary heart disease (CHD) with use of biomass fuel for cooking. Design: Comparative cross-sectional study. Setting: Rural villages in Sindh, Pakistan. Participants: Women aged ≥40 years who had used biomass fuel for cooking for at least the last year (n=436), and a comparison group (n=414) who had cooked only with non-biomass fuel during the last year were recruited through door-to-door visits. None of those who were invited to take part declined. Primary and secondary outcome measures: Hypertension was determined from blood pressure measurements and use of medication. CHD was assessed by three measures: history of angina (Rose angina questionnaire), previous history of 'heart attack', and definite or probable changes of CHD on ECG. Potentially confounding risk factors were ascertained by questionnaire and anthropometry. Associations of hypertension and CHD with use of biomass and other risk factors were assessed by logistic regression, and summarised by ORs with 95% CIs. Results: After adjustment for potential confounders, there was no association of hypertension (OR: 1.0, 95% CI 0.8 to 1.4) angina (OR: 1.0, 95% CI 0.8 to 1.4), heart attack (OR: 1.2, 95% 0.7 to 2.2) or ECG changes of CHD (OR: 0.8, 95% CI 0.6 to 1.2) with current use of biomass for cooking. Nor were any associations apparent when analyses were restricted to long-term (≥10 years) users and non-users of biomass fuel. Conclusions: A linked air monitoring study indicated substantially higher airborne concentrations of fine particulate matter in kitchens where biomass was used for cooking. It is possible that associations with CHD and hypertension were missed because most of the comparison group had used biomass for cooking at some time in the past, and risk remains elevated for many years after last exposure.

biomass fuel, coronary heart disease, epidemiology, hypertension, public health, women
2044-6055
1-11
Fatmi, Zafar
5e230061-ffb8-48e2-b989-849c1893b37b
Ntani, Georgia
9b009e0a-5ab2-4c6e-a9fd-15a601e92be5
Coggon, David
2b43ce0a-cc61-4d86-b15d-794208ffa5d3
Fatmi, Zafar
5e230061-ffb8-48e2-b989-849c1893b37b
Ntani, Georgia
9b009e0a-5ab2-4c6e-a9fd-15a601e92be5
Coggon, David
2b43ce0a-cc61-4d86-b15d-794208ffa5d3

Fatmi, Zafar, Ntani, Georgia and Coggon, David (2019) Coronary heart disease, hypertension and use of biomass fuel among women: Comparative cross-sectional study. BMJ Open, 9 (8), 1-11, [e030881]. (doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2019-030881).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objectives: To explore the associations of hypertension and coronary heart disease (CHD) with use of biomass fuel for cooking. Design: Comparative cross-sectional study. Setting: Rural villages in Sindh, Pakistan. Participants: Women aged ≥40 years who had used biomass fuel for cooking for at least the last year (n=436), and a comparison group (n=414) who had cooked only with non-biomass fuel during the last year were recruited through door-to-door visits. None of those who were invited to take part declined. Primary and secondary outcome measures: Hypertension was determined from blood pressure measurements and use of medication. CHD was assessed by three measures: history of angina (Rose angina questionnaire), previous history of 'heart attack', and definite or probable changes of CHD on ECG. Potentially confounding risk factors were ascertained by questionnaire and anthropometry. Associations of hypertension and CHD with use of biomass and other risk factors were assessed by logistic regression, and summarised by ORs with 95% CIs. Results: After adjustment for potential confounders, there was no association of hypertension (OR: 1.0, 95% CI 0.8 to 1.4) angina (OR: 1.0, 95% CI 0.8 to 1.4), heart attack (OR: 1.2, 95% 0.7 to 2.2) or ECG changes of CHD (OR: 0.8, 95% CI 0.6 to 1.2) with current use of biomass for cooking. Nor were any associations apparent when analyses were restricted to long-term (≥10 years) users and non-users of biomass fuel. Conclusions: A linked air monitoring study indicated substantially higher airborne concentrations of fine particulate matter in kitchens where biomass was used for cooking. It is possible that associations with CHD and hypertension were missed because most of the comparison group had used biomass for cooking at some time in the past, and risk remains elevated for many years after last exposure.

Text
e030881.full - Version of Record
Download (317kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 9 July 2019
Published date: 1 August 2019
Keywords: biomass fuel, coronary heart disease, epidemiology, hypertension, public health, women

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 433466
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/433466
ISSN: 2044-6055
PURE UUID: c972ec19-e341-4650-8509-c8468fdfe0b9
ORCID for David Coggon: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1930-3987

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 23 Aug 2019 16:30
Last modified: 24 Feb 2021 02:34

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×