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Implementing and embedding health informatics systems –: Understanding organizational behaviour change using Normalization Process Theory ( NPT )

Implementing and embedding health informatics systems –: Understanding organizational behaviour change using Normalization Process Theory ( NPT )
Implementing and embedding health informatics systems –: Understanding organizational behaviour change using Normalization Process Theory ( NPT )
Successful implementation of health informatics systems depends not only on efficient performance of intended tasks, but also integration into existing working relationships and environments. Implementation is an understudied area in health informatics research, and relevant empirical evidence is often absent from strategic decision making. Implementation theories such as Normalization Process Theory (NPT) can help address this gap by providing explanations for relevant phenomena, proposing important research questions, and framing collection and analysis of data. NPT identifies, characterizes, and explains mechanisms that have been empirically demonstrated to affect implementation processes and outcomes. These explanations are generalizable and facilitate comparative investigations. The first section of this chapter introduces the four main constructs of NPT (coherence, cognitive participation, collective action, and reflexive monitoring) and their constituent components. Each component is discussed with reference to a real-world example, and relationships between the four constructs are explored. The second section explores how NPT has been applied in both prospective planning of interventions and their evaluation, as well as retrospective exploration of factors promoting or inhibiting successful implementation. We examine two examples from published literature: firstly, prospective planning of an evaluation study on implementation of a digital health intervention for Type-2 diabetes; and secondly an evaluation of implementation of a new electronic preoperative information system within a surgical pre-assessment clinic. The chapter concludes with reflections on some limitations of NPT as a theoretical framework.
171-190
IOS Press
Bracher, Michael
e9e2fbd6-af5f-4f6e-8357-969aaf51c52e
May, Carl
17697f8d-98f6-40d3-9cc0-022f04009ae4
Scott, Philip
de Keizer, Nicolette
Georgiou, Andrew
Bracher, Michael
e9e2fbd6-af5f-4f6e-8357-969aaf51c52e
May, Carl
17697f8d-98f6-40d3-9cc0-022f04009ae4
Scott, Philip
de Keizer, Nicolette
Georgiou, Andrew

Bracher, Michael and May, Carl (2019) Implementing and embedding health informatics systems –: Understanding organizational behaviour change using Normalization Process Theory ( NPT ). In, Scott, Philip, de Keizer, Nicolette and Georgiou, Andrew (eds.) Applied Interdisciplinary Theory in Health Informatics. (Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, , (doi:10.3233/SHTI190121), 263) IOS Press, pp. 171-190. (doi:10.3233/SHTI190121).

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

Successful implementation of health informatics systems depends not only on efficient performance of intended tasks, but also integration into existing working relationships and environments. Implementation is an understudied area in health informatics research, and relevant empirical evidence is often absent from strategic decision making. Implementation theories such as Normalization Process Theory (NPT) can help address this gap by providing explanations for relevant phenomena, proposing important research questions, and framing collection and analysis of data. NPT identifies, characterizes, and explains mechanisms that have been empirically demonstrated to affect implementation processes and outcomes. These explanations are generalizable and facilitate comparative investigations. The first section of this chapter introduces the four main constructs of NPT (coherence, cognitive participation, collective action, and reflexive monitoring) and their constituent components. Each component is discussed with reference to a real-world example, and relationships between the four constructs are explored. The second section explores how NPT has been applied in both prospective planning of interventions and their evaluation, as well as retrospective exploration of factors promoting or inhibiting successful implementation. We examine two examples from published literature: firstly, prospective planning of an evaluation study on implementation of a digital health intervention for Type-2 diabetes; and secondly an evaluation of implementation of a new electronic preoperative information system within a surgical pre-assessment clinic. The chapter concludes with reflections on some limitations of NPT as a theoretical framework.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 26 May 2019
Published date: 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 433493
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/433493
PURE UUID: af108491-3d66-483b-a0fb-888013fbc86d
ORCID for Michael Bracher: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5861-2657
ORCID for Carl May: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0451-2690

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 23 Aug 2019 16:30
Last modified: 19 Nov 2019 01:41

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