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Effects of the interaction between temperature and steroid hormones on gametogenesis and sex ratio in the European flat oyster (Ostrea edulis)

Effects of the interaction between temperature and steroid hormones on gametogenesis and sex ratio in the European flat oyster (Ostrea edulis)
Effects of the interaction between temperature and steroid hormones on gametogenesis and sex ratio in the European flat oyster (Ostrea edulis)
Throughout Europe, populations of Ostrea edulis have been in decline since the 1970s. Temperature is an important influence on the physiological, biochemical and reproductive attributes of oysters. It is also the most easily modulated environmental factor in hatcheries, so it is useful to understand the implications of temperature variation in driving gametogenesis and sex development in protandrous sequential hermaphrodites such as O. edulis. To understand the effect of temperature on gametogenesis and sex ratio, as well as the potential mechanism of sex determination through the role of steroid hormone homologues, oysters were exposed to three temperatures (10, 14, and 18oC) for four months. Gametogenic stage and sex ratio were assessed histologically for each treatment. In parallel, concentrations of estradiol (E2)- and testosterone (T)- were determined in developing gonads. Our data show that by some biometric parameters, gametogenesis and sex ratio were significantly influenced by temperature during the experiment. There was a weak but significant correlation between E2 and T concentration during the treatments. However, and importantly, a direct relation between gonadal maturation, sex determination and hormones concentration was not found. These results suggest that gametogenesis and sex determination are predominantly affected by temperature in this species, and that steroids may not be actively involved as endogenous modulators in sex determination. Rising sea water temperatures and warmer condition through the year could cause an accelerated gametogenesis and skewed sex ratios in natural populations of O. edulis.
estradiol, gametogenesis, sex ratio, temperature, testosterone, Ostrea edulis
1095-6433
1-11
Zapata Restrepo, Lina, Maria
05a5bba1-27a9-4210-b350-df4ea7e496d8
Hauton, Christopher
7706f6ba-4497-42b2-8c6d-00df81676331
Williams, Ian
c9d674ac-ee69-4937-ab43-17e716266e22
Jensen, Antony
ff1cabd2-e6fa-4e34-9a39-5097e2bc5f85
Hudson, Malcolm
1ae18506-6f2a-48af-8c72-83ab28679f55
Zapata Restrepo, Lina, Maria
05a5bba1-27a9-4210-b350-df4ea7e496d8
Hauton, Christopher
7706f6ba-4497-42b2-8c6d-00df81676331
Williams, Ian
c9d674ac-ee69-4937-ab43-17e716266e22
Jensen, Antony
ff1cabd2-e6fa-4e34-9a39-5097e2bc5f85
Hudson, Malcolm
1ae18506-6f2a-48af-8c72-83ab28679f55

Zapata Restrepo, Lina, Maria, Hauton, Christopher, Williams, Ian, Jensen, Antony and Hudson, Malcolm (2019) Effects of the interaction between temperature and steroid hormones on gametogenesis and sex ratio in the European flat oyster (Ostrea edulis). Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. Part A: Molecular & Integrative Physiology, 236, 1-11. (doi:10.1016/j.cbpa.2019.06.023).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Throughout Europe, populations of Ostrea edulis have been in decline since the 1970s. Temperature is an important influence on the physiological, biochemical and reproductive attributes of oysters. It is also the most easily modulated environmental factor in hatcheries, so it is useful to understand the implications of temperature variation in driving gametogenesis and sex development in protandrous sequential hermaphrodites such as O. edulis. To understand the effect of temperature on gametogenesis and sex ratio, as well as the potential mechanism of sex determination through the role of steroid hormone homologues, oysters were exposed to three temperatures (10, 14, and 18oC) for four months. Gametogenic stage and sex ratio were assessed histologically for each treatment. In parallel, concentrations of estradiol (E2)- and testosterone (T)- were determined in developing gonads. Our data show that by some biometric parameters, gametogenesis and sex ratio were significantly influenced by temperature during the experiment. There was a weak but significant correlation between E2 and T concentration during the treatments. However, and importantly, a direct relation between gonadal maturation, sex determination and hormones concentration was not found. These results suggest that gametogenesis and sex determination are predominantly affected by temperature in this species, and that steroids may not be actively involved as endogenous modulators in sex determination. Rising sea water temperatures and warmer condition through the year could cause an accelerated gametogenesis and skewed sex ratios in natural populations of O. edulis.

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Accepted/In Press date: 26 June 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 4 July 2019
Published date: October 2019
Keywords: estradiol, gametogenesis, sex ratio, temperature, testosterone, Ostrea edulis

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 433566
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/433566
ISSN: 1095-6433
PURE UUID: 7856d86f-d492-463b-abff-681a19654075
ORCID for Christopher Hauton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2313-4226
ORCID for Ian Williams: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0121-1219

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Date deposited: 27 Aug 2019 16:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 05:53

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