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A framework for recording shipwreck landscapes: A case study from Port MacDonnell, South Australia

A framework for recording shipwreck landscapes: A case study from Port MacDonnell, South Australia
A framework for recording shipwreck landscapes: A case study from Port MacDonnell, South Australia
Maritime archaeology has not fully explored the relationship between shipwrecks and their impacts on local communities. Shipwreck events play a part in a long-term process where the place continues to alter the surrounding environment and becomes a landscape. When a wreck occurs near shore or onshore in a remote area, it impacts on the land and creates archaeological signatures. However, when a ship wrecks near a settlement, its impact can also alter the actions, attitudes and dynamics of local communities. The effects of wrecks can affect the landscape over time through artefacts being moved and removed, folklore and place names. Duncan (2006: 241, 281) suggests a need to look beyond the shipwreck site to the archaeological material associated with it, which is no longer in situ; as the opposite, site-specific interpretation ignores the impact of shipwrecks on the surrounding landscapes, including coastal communities. Gibbs (2006: 18) notes that material and artefacts follow many trajectories away from shipwreck sites often much further afield than the original wreck location. Gibbs (2006) and Duncan (2000; 2006) also suggest that communities prepared for the incidence of wrecks, for example through risk mitigation, and that such incidents influenced the structure of community relationships.
1447-0276
33-41
Fowler, Madeline
12991e11-03f8-4f22-9612-6dafb0cf832b
Fowler, Madeline
12991e11-03f8-4f22-9612-6dafb0cf832b

Fowler, Madeline (2013) A framework for recording shipwreck landscapes: A case study from Port MacDonnell, South Australia. Australasian Institute for Maritime Archaeology Bulletin, 37, 33-41.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Maritime archaeology has not fully explored the relationship between shipwrecks and their impacts on local communities. Shipwreck events play a part in a long-term process where the place continues to alter the surrounding environment and becomes a landscape. When a wreck occurs near shore or onshore in a remote area, it impacts on the land and creates archaeological signatures. However, when a ship wrecks near a settlement, its impact can also alter the actions, attitudes and dynamics of local communities. The effects of wrecks can affect the landscape over time through artefacts being moved and removed, folklore and place names. Duncan (2006: 241, 281) suggests a need to look beyond the shipwreck site to the archaeological material associated with it, which is no longer in situ; as the opposite, site-specific interpretation ignores the impact of shipwrecks on the surrounding landscapes, including coastal communities. Gibbs (2006: 18) notes that material and artefacts follow many trajectories away from shipwreck sites often much further afield than the original wreck location. Gibbs (2006) and Duncan (2000; 2006) also suggest that communities prepared for the incidence of wrecks, for example through risk mitigation, and that such incidents influenced the structure of community relationships.

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Published date: November 2013

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 433592
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/433592
ISSN: 1447-0276
PURE UUID: 2357b957-2052-4186-8ba7-8669501e20b0

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Date deposited: 28 Aug 2019 16:30
Last modified: 13 May 2020 16:44

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