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Rich pickings: an analysis of opportunistic behaviour at Rangitoto Island, Aotearoa/New Zealand

Rich pickings: an analysis of opportunistic behaviour at Rangitoto Island, Aotearoa/New Zealand
Rich pickings: an analysis of opportunistic behaviour at Rangitoto Island, Aotearoa/New Zealand
Rangitoto Island, Aotearoa/New Zealand, is the location of a graveyard of abandoned vessels and three communities of baches (circa 1910s–1930s)—small and modest holiday homes. In 2014, an archival and archaeological investigation of 11 discarded watercraft located at Boulder Bay and the bach communities of Beacon End, Rangitoto Wharf and Islington Bay revealed evidence of salvage and reuse of abandoned vessel materials in the construction, modification and use of the island’s baches. This evidence in turn provides insight into opportunistic behaviours of communities unassociated with the maritime industries that created ships’ graveyards, and consequently affords a more well-rounded understanding of post-depositional site formation processes. Influenced by social and economic impacts, the Rangitoto Island bach communities’ resourcefulness enhances our knowledge of behaviours towards ships as sources of material.
1557-2285
179-196
Bennett, Kurt
12145d9c-a63e-44bf-882f-2db0f0da384d
Fowler, Madeline
12991e11-03f8-4f22-9612-6dafb0cf832b
Bennett, Kurt
12145d9c-a63e-44bf-882f-2db0f0da384d
Fowler, Madeline
12991e11-03f8-4f22-9612-6dafb0cf832b

Bennett, Kurt and Fowler, Madeline (2016) Rich pickings: an analysis of opportunistic behaviour at Rangitoto Island, Aotearoa/New Zealand. Journal of Maritime Archaeology, 11 (2), 179-196. (doi:10.1007/s11457-016-9161-8).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Rangitoto Island, Aotearoa/New Zealand, is the location of a graveyard of abandoned vessels and three communities of baches (circa 1910s–1930s)—small and modest holiday homes. In 2014, an archival and archaeological investigation of 11 discarded watercraft located at Boulder Bay and the bach communities of Beacon End, Rangitoto Wharf and Islington Bay revealed evidence of salvage and reuse of abandoned vessel materials in the construction, modification and use of the island’s baches. This evidence in turn provides insight into opportunistic behaviours of communities unassociated with the maritime industries that created ships’ graveyards, and consequently affords a more well-rounded understanding of post-depositional site formation processes. Influenced by social and economic impacts, the Rangitoto Island bach communities’ resourcefulness enhances our knowledge of behaviours towards ships as sources of material.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 7 July 2016
Published date: August 2016

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 433595
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/433595
ISSN: 1557-2285
PURE UUID: f688e600-2489-42b5-bde9-ffe2c397eb28

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 28 Aug 2019 16:30
Last modified: 05 Sep 2019 16:30

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