The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

The influence of omega-3 fatty acids on skeletal muscle protein turnover in health, disuse, and disease

The influence of omega-3 fatty acids on skeletal muscle protein turnover in health, disuse, and disease
The influence of omega-3 fatty acids on skeletal muscle protein turnover in health, disuse, and disease
Ingestion of omega-3 fatty acids is known to exert favorable health effects on a number of biological processes such as improved immune profile, enhanced cognition, and optimized neuromuscular function. Recently, data have emerged demonstrating a positive influence of omega-3 fatty acid intake on skeletal muscle. For instance, there are reports of clinically-relevant gains in muscle size and strength in healthy older persons with omega-3 fatty acid intake as well as evidence that omega-3 fatty acid ingestion alleviates the loss of muscle mass and prevents decrements in mitochondrial respiration during periods of muscle-disuse. Cancer cachexia that is characterized by a rapid involuntary loss of lean mass may also be attenuated by omega-3 fatty acid provision. The primary means by which omega-3 fatty acids positively impact skeletal muscle mass is via incorporation of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5n−3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n−3) into membrane phospholipids of the sarcolemma and intracellular organelles. Enrichment of EPA and DHA in these membrane phospholipids is linked to enhanced rates of muscle protein synthesis, decreased expression of factors that regulate muscle protein breakdown, and improved mitochondrial respiration kinetics. However, exactly how incorporation of EPA and DHA into phospholipid membranes alters these processes remains unknown. In this review, we discuss the interaction between omega-3 fatty acid ingestion and skeletal muscle protein turnover in response to nutrient provision in younger and older adults. Additionally, we examine the role of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation in protecting muscle loss during muscle-disuse and in cancer cachexia, and critically evaluate the molecular mechanisms that underpin the phenotypic changes observed in skeletal muscle with omega-3 fatty acid intake.
2296-861X
McGlory, Chris
a9882ee9-88ab-40c9-8c20-eadbabde58b2
Calder, Philip
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
Nunes, Everson A.
aff61599-17d5-4213-a07f-68a2b3375ef1
McGlory, Chris
a9882ee9-88ab-40c9-8c20-eadbabde58b2
Calder, Philip
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
Nunes, Everson A.
aff61599-17d5-4213-a07f-68a2b3375ef1

McGlory, Chris, Calder, Philip and Nunes, Everson A. (2019) The influence of omega-3 fatty acids on skeletal muscle protein turnover in health, disuse, and disease. Frontiers in Nutrition, 6, [144]. (doi:10.3389/fnut.2019.00144).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Ingestion of omega-3 fatty acids is known to exert favorable health effects on a number of biological processes such as improved immune profile, enhanced cognition, and optimized neuromuscular function. Recently, data have emerged demonstrating a positive influence of omega-3 fatty acid intake on skeletal muscle. For instance, there are reports of clinically-relevant gains in muscle size and strength in healthy older persons with omega-3 fatty acid intake as well as evidence that omega-3 fatty acid ingestion alleviates the loss of muscle mass and prevents decrements in mitochondrial respiration during periods of muscle-disuse. Cancer cachexia that is characterized by a rapid involuntary loss of lean mass may also be attenuated by omega-3 fatty acid provision. The primary means by which omega-3 fatty acids positively impact skeletal muscle mass is via incorporation of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5n−3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n−3) into membrane phospholipids of the sarcolemma and intracellular organelles. Enrichment of EPA and DHA in these membrane phospholipids is linked to enhanced rates of muscle protein synthesis, decreased expression of factors that regulate muscle protein breakdown, and improved mitochondrial respiration kinetics. However, exactly how incorporation of EPA and DHA into phospholipid membranes alters these processes remains unknown. In this review, we discuss the interaction between omega-3 fatty acid ingestion and skeletal muscle protein turnover in response to nutrient provision in younger and older adults. Additionally, we examine the role of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation in protecting muscle loss during muscle-disuse and in cancer cachexia, and critically evaluate the molecular mechanisms that underpin the phenotypic changes observed in skeletal muscle with omega-3 fatty acid intake.

Text
Manuscript mcglory accepted - Accepted Manuscript
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (355kB)
Image
Figure 1 (003) - Accepted Manuscript
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (70kB)
Image
Figure 2 - Accepted Manuscript
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (82kB)
Text
fnut-06-00144 - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (709kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 19 August 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 6 September 2019
Published date: 6 September 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 433615
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/433615
ISSN: 2296-861X
PURE UUID: 2b7da684-d55c-48f0-8476-ad449a9cd599
ORCID for Philip Calder: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6038-710X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 28 Aug 2019 16:30
Last modified: 22 Nov 2021 07:37

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Chris McGlory
Author: Philip Calder ORCID iD
Author: Everson A. Nunes

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×