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Observational properties of thermonuclear supernovae

Observational properties of thermonuclear supernovae
Observational properties of thermonuclear supernovae

The explosive death of a star as a supernova is one of the most dramatic events in the Universe. Supernovae have an outsized impact on many areas of astrophysics: they are major contributors to the chemical enrichment of the cosmos and significantly influence the formation of subsequent generations of stars and the evolution of galaxies. Here we review the observational properties of thermonuclear supernovae—exploding white dwarf stars resulting from the stellar evolution of low-mass stars in close binary systems. The best known objects in this class are type-Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), astrophysically important in their application as standardizable candles to measure cosmological distances and the primary source of iron group elements in the Universe. Surprisingly, given their prominent role, SN Ia progenitor systems and explosion mechanisms are not fully understood; the observations we describe here provide constraints on models, not always in consistent ways. Recent advances in supernova discovery and follow-up have shown that the class of thermonuclear supernovae includes more than just SNe Ia, and we characterize that diversity in this review.

2397-3366
706-716
Jha, Saurabh W.
c3b609d1-0383-4d70-b0c2-f4a813a77211
Maguire, Kate
bff26e2d-9727-471e-aa6f-c88e11a2b1a1
Sullivan, Mark
2f31f9fa-8e79-4b35-98e2-0cb38f503850
Jha, Saurabh W.
c3b609d1-0383-4d70-b0c2-f4a813a77211
Maguire, Kate
bff26e2d-9727-471e-aa6f-c88e11a2b1a1
Sullivan, Mark
2f31f9fa-8e79-4b35-98e2-0cb38f503850

Jha, Saurabh W., Maguire, Kate and Sullivan, Mark (2019) Observational properties of thermonuclear supernovae. Nature Astronomy, 3 (8), 706-716. (doi:10.1038/s41550-019-0858-0).

Record type: Review

Abstract

The explosive death of a star as a supernova is one of the most dramatic events in the Universe. Supernovae have an outsized impact on many areas of astrophysics: they are major contributors to the chemical enrichment of the cosmos and significantly influence the formation of subsequent generations of stars and the evolution of galaxies. Here we review the observational properties of thermonuclear supernovae—exploding white dwarf stars resulting from the stellar evolution of low-mass stars in close binary systems. The best known objects in this class are type-Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), astrophysically important in their application as standardizable candles to measure cosmological distances and the primary source of iron group elements in the Universe. Surprisingly, given their prominent role, SN Ia progenitor systems and explosion mechanisms are not fully understood; the observations we describe here provide constraints on models, not always in consistent ways. Recent advances in supernova discovery and follow-up have shown that the class of thermonuclear supernovae includes more than just SNe Ia, and we characterize that diversity in this review.

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Observational properties of thermonuclear supernovae - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 5 July 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 7 August 2019
Published date: August 2019
Additional Information: arXiv is AM

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 433697
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/433697
ISSN: 2397-3366
PURE UUID: b490a4c9-bc2f-4a1e-bbf6-a3331dd63f18
ORCID for Mark Sullivan: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9053-4820

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Date deposited: 30 Aug 2019 16:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 06:37

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Contributors

Author: Saurabh W. Jha
Author: Kate Maguire
Author: Mark Sullivan ORCID iD

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