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Professional identity formation in contemporary higher education students

Professional identity formation in contemporary higher education students
Professional identity formation in contemporary higher education students
The study examines the prevalence of emergent professional identity (PI) among different groups of higher education students as well as the determining factors in the formation of PI. Drawing on evidence from a survey among Australian and UK students (N=433), from two institutions and across a range of disciplines, empirical and conceptual insights are developed on the formation and impacts of students’ professional identity. The article shows the significance of identity formation as a crucial bridge between higher education and future employment and its mediation by other key resources - in particular social and cultural capital- that students acquire before entering the labour market. The relative strength of identity formations can impact on students’ sense of familiarity, proximity, and confidence around targeted employment areas. The article finally discusses the implications this has for individuals and institutions.
Professional identity, employability, graduates, resources, strategies
0307-5079
885-900
Tomlinson, Michael
9dd1cbf0-d3b0-421e-8ded-b3949ebcee18
Jackson, Denise
804498bf-3359-4f61-a0f2-bb2377308cd4
Tomlinson, Michael
9dd1cbf0-d3b0-421e-8ded-b3949ebcee18
Jackson, Denise
804498bf-3359-4f61-a0f2-bb2377308cd4

Tomlinson, Michael and Jackson, Denise (2021) Professional identity formation in contemporary higher education students. Studies in Higher Education, 46 (4), 885-900. (doi:10.1080/03075079.2019.1659763).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The study examines the prevalence of emergent professional identity (PI) among different groups of higher education students as well as the determining factors in the formation of PI. Drawing on evidence from a survey among Australian and UK students (N=433), from two institutions and across a range of disciplines, empirical and conceptual insights are developed on the formation and impacts of students’ professional identity. The article shows the significance of identity formation as a crucial bridge between higher education and future employment and its mediation by other key resources - in particular social and cultural capital- that students acquire before entering the labour market. The relative strength of identity formations can impact on students’ sense of familiarity, proximity, and confidence around targeted employment areas. The article finally discusses the implications this has for individuals and institutions.

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Professional identity formation in contemporary higher education students_FINAL 150819 - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 15 August 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 4 September 2019
Published date: 8 March 2021
Keywords: Professional identity, employability, graduates, resources, strategies

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 433712
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/433712
ISSN: 0307-5079
PURE UUID: 3e187bcf-7970-4be7-90af-fef300c85f5f
ORCID for Michael Tomlinson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1057-5188

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Date deposited: 02 Sep 2019 16:30
Last modified: 28 Apr 2022 02:05

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Contributors

Author: Denise Jackson

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