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Effect of event orderings on memory requirement in parallel simulation

Effect of event orderings on memory requirement in parallel simulation
Effect of event orderings on memory requirement in parallel simulation

A new formal approach based on partial order set (poset) theory is proposed to analyze the space requirement of discrete-event parallel simulation. We divide the memory required by a simulation problem into memory to model the states of the real-world system, memory to maintain a list of future event occurrences, and memory required to implement the event synchronization protocol. We establish the relationship between poset theory and event orderings in simulation. Based on our framework, we analyze the space requirement using an open and a closed system as examples. Our analysis shows that apart from problem size and traffic intensity that affects the memory requirement, event ordering is an important factor that can be analyzed before implementation. In an open system, a weaker event ordered simulation requires more memory than strong ordering. However, the memory requirement is constant and independent of event ordering in closed systems.

41-48
Teo, Y.M.
16d4240a-2b2c-4004-80b3-7c3b7dbd84eb
Onggo, B.S.S.
8e9a2ea5-140a-44c0-9c17-e9cf93662f80
Tay, S.C.
71a95a7e-6bbe-4d7e-979c-bbd378ba55f2
Teo, Y.M.
16d4240a-2b2c-4004-80b3-7c3b7dbd84eb
Onggo, B.S.S.
8e9a2ea5-140a-44c0-9c17-e9cf93662f80
Tay, S.C.
71a95a7e-6bbe-4d7e-979c-bbd378ba55f2

Teo, Y.M., Onggo, B.S.S. and Tay, S.C. (2001) Effect of event orderings on memory requirement in parallel simulation. 9th International Symposium on Modeling, Analysis and Simulation of Computer and Telecommunication Systems (MASCOTS 2001), , Cincinnati, OH, United States. 15 - 18 Aug 2001. pp. 41-48 .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

A new formal approach based on partial order set (poset) theory is proposed to analyze the space requirement of discrete-event parallel simulation. We divide the memory required by a simulation problem into memory to model the states of the real-world system, memory to maintain a list of future event occurrences, and memory required to implement the event synchronization protocol. We establish the relationship between poset theory and event orderings in simulation. Based on our framework, we analyze the space requirement using an open and a closed system as examples. Our analysis shows that apart from problem size and traffic intensity that affects the memory requirement, event ordering is an important factor that can be analyzed before implementation. In an open system, a weaker event ordered simulation requires more memory than strong ordering. However, the memory requirement is constant and independent of event ordering in closed systems.

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More information

Published date: 1 January 2001
Venue - Dates: 9th International Symposium on Modeling, Analysis and Simulation of Computer and Telecommunication Systems (MASCOTS 2001), , Cincinnati, OH, United States, 2001-08-15 - 2001-08-18

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 433756
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/433756
PURE UUID: b21048c5-a14c-406e-924b-94b00fda9792
ORCID for B.S.S. Onggo: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5899-304X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 03 Sep 2019 16:30
Last modified: 25 Jun 2022 01:58

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Contributors

Author: Y.M. Teo
Author: B.S.S. Onggo ORCID iD
Author: S.C. Tay

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