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What are the patterns and predictors of physical activity in hospitalised older adults? Findings from the Southampton Mobility Volunteer (SoMoVe) study

What are the patterns and predictors of physical activity in hospitalised older adults? Findings from the Southampton Mobility Volunteer (SoMoVe) study
What are the patterns and predictors of physical activity in hospitalised older adults? Findings from the Southampton Mobility Volunteer (SoMoVe) study
Introduction: Older adults admitted to hospital often leave with a loss of functional independence. In-patient physical activity levels within this age group are known to be low, with medical illness, frailty, and the hospital environment all contributing. Less is known about patterns of activity throughout the day. This study aimed to examine the patterns and predictors of physical activity amongst older inpatients.

Methods: We collected data from 42 inpatients (mean age 87.5 (SD 4.7) years) at one hospital. The inclusion criteria were patients aged ≥70 years, mobile prior to hospital admission, and able to provide valid written consent. Data collection to establish baseline characteristics included functional measures such as gait speed, timed up and go, Barthel Index, Elderly Mobility Scale and MMSE. Physical activity levels were measured for up to seven consecutive days, using the GENEActiv wrist worn accelerometer.

Results: The difference in mean acceleration between males (10.3 milli-g) and females (7.7 milli-g) was significant (p = 0.008). The median time spent engaging in meaningful physical activity (defined as 20 milli-g and above) for men was 93 (IQR 53–142) minutes per 24 hours, and 33 (IQR 24–60) minutes for women. Faster gait speed was significantly associated with greater mean acceleration (p = 0.002; r = 0.643). There was no evidence of reduced activity levels in the afternoon or evening compared to the morning, although there was a trend towards lower activity levels at night.

Conclusions: This study has shown that mean levels of physical activity were very low in hospitalised older adults, particularly in women, equivalent to standing still. The level of activity was similar throughout the day. Gait speed is a simple test and was strongly associated with physical activity. Gait speed has potential to be developed into a framework that identifies patients at risk of low levels of physical activity whilst in hospital.
ii12–ii13
Oxford University Press
Bacon, David
e3465208-c360-4d45-b8c9-7ace451a7d43
Lim, Stephen
dd2bfbd7-7f74-4365-b77e-9989f6408ddc
Roberts, Helen
5ea688b1-ef7a-4173-9da0-26290e18f253
Dodds, Richard M.
7f81e664-f9c8-47ea-b5fd-ee7eab2439d4
Bacon, David
e3465208-c360-4d45-b8c9-7ace451a7d43
Lim, Stephen
dd2bfbd7-7f74-4365-b77e-9989f6408ddc
Roberts, Helen
5ea688b1-ef7a-4173-9da0-26290e18f253
Dodds, Richard M.
7f81e664-f9c8-47ea-b5fd-ee7eab2439d4

Bacon, David, Lim, Stephen, Roberts, Helen and Dodds, Richard M. (2018) What are the patterns and predictors of physical activity in hospitalised older adults? Findings from the Southampton Mobility Volunteer (SoMoVe) study. In Age and Ageing. vol. 47, Oxford University Press. ii12–ii13 . (doi:10.1093/ageing/afy035.07).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Introduction: Older adults admitted to hospital often leave with a loss of functional independence. In-patient physical activity levels within this age group are known to be low, with medical illness, frailty, and the hospital environment all contributing. Less is known about patterns of activity throughout the day. This study aimed to examine the patterns and predictors of physical activity amongst older inpatients.

Methods: We collected data from 42 inpatients (mean age 87.5 (SD 4.7) years) at one hospital. The inclusion criteria were patients aged ≥70 years, mobile prior to hospital admission, and able to provide valid written consent. Data collection to establish baseline characteristics included functional measures such as gait speed, timed up and go, Barthel Index, Elderly Mobility Scale and MMSE. Physical activity levels were measured for up to seven consecutive days, using the GENEActiv wrist worn accelerometer.

Results: The difference in mean acceleration between males (10.3 milli-g) and females (7.7 milli-g) was significant (p = 0.008). The median time spent engaging in meaningful physical activity (defined as 20 milli-g and above) for men was 93 (IQR 53–142) minutes per 24 hours, and 33 (IQR 24–60) minutes for women. Faster gait speed was significantly associated with greater mean acceleration (p = 0.002; r = 0.643). There was no evidence of reduced activity levels in the afternoon or evening compared to the morning, although there was a trend towards lower activity levels at night.

Conclusions: This study has shown that mean levels of physical activity were very low in hospitalised older adults, particularly in women, equivalent to standing still. The level of activity was similar throughout the day. Gait speed is a simple test and was strongly associated with physical activity. Gait speed has potential to be developed into a framework that identifies patients at risk of low levels of physical activity whilst in hospital.

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Published date: 27 March 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 433874
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/433874
PURE UUID: 76ed91b2-f0a2-4f95-914d-430e8209411e
ORCID for Helen Roberts: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5291-1880

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Date deposited: 05 Sep 2019 16:30
Last modified: 06 Sep 2019 00:36

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Author: David Bacon
Author: Stephen Lim
Author: Helen Roberts ORCID iD
Author: Richard M. Dodds

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