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Synthesis of organic chromophores for use in electro-optic polymers

Synthesis of organic chromophores for use in electro-optic polymers
Synthesis of organic chromophores for use in electro-optic polymers
One of the most rapidly advancing technologies in the field of optoelectronics is optical modulation, with recent research focusing on the use of organic chromophore-containing polymers to achieve this modulation. These polymer-based optical modulators achieve modulation speeds far beyond their mechanical or electronic counterparts, and further success in this field could pave the way for future technologies such as LiFi (light-based WiFi) communications and LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging).

In collaboration with the Optoelectronics Research Centre at the University of Southampton, this project has been centred around synthesising organic chromophores and chromophore-containing polymers for use in the department’s optical modulators, with an aim of synthesising several novel chromophores by the end of the project.

Over the course of the project a PMMA-chromophore copolymer was made from the commercially available chromophore Disperse Red 1 and several steps of a multi-step chromophore synthesis were completed. However, due to repeated failures of several of the steps the final stage of the chromophore synthesis was not completed, although the results from tests of these steps under different conditions may prove useful for future attempts of this project.
University of Southampton
Jenner, Matthew, Owen
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Jenner, Matthew, Owen
e3617b3d-bfce-4211-b355-8c6d130dd9db
Rios Torres, Ramon
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Jenner, Matthew, Owen (2018) Synthesis of organic chromophores for use in electro-optic polymers. University of Southampton, Masters Thesis, 80pp.

Record type: Thesis (Masters)

Abstract

One of the most rapidly advancing technologies in the field of optoelectronics is optical modulation, with recent research focusing on the use of organic chromophore-containing polymers to achieve this modulation. These polymer-based optical modulators achieve modulation speeds far beyond their mechanical or electronic counterparts, and further success in this field could pave the way for future technologies such as LiFi (light-based WiFi) communications and LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging).

In collaboration with the Optoelectronics Research Centre at the University of Southampton, this project has been centred around synthesising organic chromophores and chromophore-containing polymers for use in the department’s optical modulators, with an aim of synthesising several novel chromophores by the end of the project.

Over the course of the project a PMMA-chromophore copolymer was made from the commercially available chromophore Disperse Red 1 and several steps of a multi-step chromophore synthesis were completed. However, due to repeated failures of several of the steps the final stage of the chromophore synthesis was not completed, although the results from tests of these steps under different conditions may prove useful for future attempts of this project.

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M Jenner - MPhil Thesis (final) - Version of Record
Available under License University of Southampton Thesis Licence.
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Published date: December 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 433935
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/433935
PURE UUID: 529b86f1-56ac-41ca-882d-aa4338e51451
ORCID for Ramon Rios Torres: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3843-8521

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 Sep 2019 16:30
Last modified: 31 Dec 2019 05:01

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