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Acoustically responsive polydopamine nanodroplets: A novel theranostic agent

Acoustically responsive polydopamine nanodroplets: A novel theranostic agent
Acoustically responsive polydopamine nanodroplets: A novel theranostic agent
Ultrasound-induced cavitation has been used as a tool of enhancing extravasation and tissue penetration of anticancer agents in tumours. Initiating cavitation in tissue however, requires high acoustic intensities that are neither safe nor easy to achieve with current clinical systems. The use of cavitation nuclei can however lower the acoustic intensities required to initiate cavitation and the resulting bio-effects in situ. Microbubbles, solid gas-trapping nanoparticles, and phase shift nanodroplets are some examples in a growing list of proposed cavitation nuclei. Besides the ability to lower the cavitation threshold, stability, long circulation times, biocompatibility and biodegradability, are some of the desirable characteristics that a clinically applicable cavitation agent should possess. In this study, we present a novel formulation of ultrasound-triggered phase transition sub-micrometer sized nanodroplets (~400 nm) stabilised with a biocompatible polymer, polydopamine (PDA). PDA offers some important benefits: (1) facile fabrication, as dopamine monomers are directly polymerised on the nanodroplets, (2) high polymer biocompatibility, and (3) ease of functionalisation with other molecules such as drugs or targeting species. We demonstrate that the acoustic intensities required to initiate inertial cavitation can all be achieved with existing clinical ultrasound systems. Cell viability and haemolysis studies show that nanodroplets are biocompatible. Our results demonstrate the great potential of PDA nanodroplets as an acoustically active nanodevice, which is highly valuable for biomedical applications including drug delivery and treatment monitoring.
Acoustic droplet vaporization, Nanodroplets, Polydopamine, Ultrasound
1350-4177
1-22
Mannaris, Christophoros
ec9c3302-0a0a-4953-840b-26ff09b4e633
Yang, Chuanxu
491ae7f0-eaa7-4a49-9746-4b79d8407bbb
Carugo, Dario
0a4be6cd-e309-4ed8-a620-20256ce01179
Owen, Joshua
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Lee, Jeong Yu
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Nwokeoha, Sandra
9bcac855-b7a7-444a-b8c9-ff4cc2180059
Seth, Anjali
92f275f5-ebf6-4e76-9c16-d8438f765ca2
Teo, Boon Mian
f45e83fa-616c-42ac-88c7-1ff92b7386af
Mannaris, Christophoros
ec9c3302-0a0a-4953-840b-26ff09b4e633
Yang, Chuanxu
491ae7f0-eaa7-4a49-9746-4b79d8407bbb
Carugo, Dario
0a4be6cd-e309-4ed8-a620-20256ce01179
Owen, Joshua
4e7fc6bc-f2c5-4622-894f-9e811eca84cd
Lee, Jeong Yu
7f741177-82dd-4ea3-a467-6dc87739ec48
Nwokeoha, Sandra
9bcac855-b7a7-444a-b8c9-ff4cc2180059
Seth, Anjali
92f275f5-ebf6-4e76-9c16-d8438f765ca2
Teo, Boon Mian
f45e83fa-616c-42ac-88c7-1ff92b7386af

Mannaris, Christophoros, Yang, Chuanxu, Carugo, Dario, Owen, Joshua, Lee, Jeong Yu, Nwokeoha, Sandra, Seth, Anjali and Teo, Boon Mian (2020) Acoustically responsive polydopamine nanodroplets: A novel theranostic agent. Ultrasonics Sonochemistry, 60, 1-22, [104782]. (doi:10.1016/j.ultsonch.2019.104782).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Ultrasound-induced cavitation has been used as a tool of enhancing extravasation and tissue penetration of anticancer agents in tumours. Initiating cavitation in tissue however, requires high acoustic intensities that are neither safe nor easy to achieve with current clinical systems. The use of cavitation nuclei can however lower the acoustic intensities required to initiate cavitation and the resulting bio-effects in situ. Microbubbles, solid gas-trapping nanoparticles, and phase shift nanodroplets are some examples in a growing list of proposed cavitation nuclei. Besides the ability to lower the cavitation threshold, stability, long circulation times, biocompatibility and biodegradability, are some of the desirable characteristics that a clinically applicable cavitation agent should possess. In this study, we present a novel formulation of ultrasound-triggered phase transition sub-micrometer sized nanodroplets (~400 nm) stabilised with a biocompatible polymer, polydopamine (PDA). PDA offers some important benefits: (1) facile fabrication, as dopamine monomers are directly polymerised on the nanodroplets, (2) high polymer biocompatibility, and (3) ease of functionalisation with other molecules such as drugs or targeting species. We demonstrate that the acoustic intensities required to initiate inertial cavitation can all be achieved with existing clinical ultrasound systems. Cell viability and haemolysis studies show that nanodroplets are biocompatible. Our results demonstrate the great potential of PDA nanodroplets as an acoustically active nanodevice, which is highly valuable for biomedical applications including drug delivery and treatment monitoring.

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Mannarisetal_revised - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 6 September 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 6 September 2019
Published date: January 2020
Keywords: Acoustic droplet vaporization, Nanodroplets, Polydopamine, Ultrasound

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 433956
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/433956
ISSN: 1350-4177
PURE UUID: dca20416-c916-4af9-8a19-d1d18393307c

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Date deposited: 09 Sep 2019 16:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 06:30

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Contributors

Author: Christophoros Mannaris
Author: Chuanxu Yang
Author: Dario Carugo
Author: Joshua Owen
Author: Jeong Yu Lee
Author: Sandra Nwokeoha
Author: Anjali Seth
Author: Boon Mian Teo

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