The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

Developing a new social networked self-management tool for people living with joint pain: identifying individuals’ needs and priorities

Developing a new social networked self-management tool for people living with joint pain: identifying individuals’ needs and priorities
Developing a new social networked self-management tool for people living with joint pain: identifying individuals’ needs and priorities
Background: Joint pain caused by osteoarthritis (OA) has a substantial impact on everyday life. The costs associated with managing OA are considerable for the individual and for society. Self-management support strategies may assist to mediate the individual costs and technology may contribute to their delivery. Self-management strategies may include the provision of accessible information about OA and the means to identify and engage with resources and opportunities for support from social network members. In doing so, people may be facilitated to access new and existing connections to mobilise support for the management of joint pain. Such approaches have been effective in supporting people to manage other long-term conditions.

Methods: This research aimed to develop a novel web-based resource for self-management of joint pain. To understand the needs and priorities of people living with joint pain for self-management support, three focus groups were undertaken in the community. Participants were asked to review two existing websites and provide feedback. The first website (www.myjointpain.org.au) provided health-based information and symptom advice, designed to be used independently. The second was a social network-mapping tool called Genie (genie.soton.ac.uk) designed to engage people to connections and activities, which was facilitated by the research team. Both are intended to be used to develop the intervention. The data from each focus group was recorded and transcribed, then coded and categorised to identify guiding principles for the content and usability of the intervention. Ethics approval was gained from the University of Southampton, Faculty of Health Sciences committee (Ref. 40268.A1).

Results: Eleven participants were recruited from three community groups. Five categories were identified, including: flexibility, complementarity, tailoring, introductions/engagement and self-management aims. Flexibility: Participants wanted the new site to be adaptable enough to meet their needs at different times. Therefore, some wanted health advice first, followed by social network support, while others wanted flexibility to choose based on their needs. Complementarity: Participants considered that the two websites were complementary and if brought together would allow people to find strategies and support to manage their joint pain. Tailoring: Tailoring was considered important to ensure relevance, trust and reassurance in the information presented. Introductions/engagement: The person or context of the introduction to the site was linked to perceived trust in the site content. Self-management aims: Participants considered that a web-based self-management tool could alleviate some of the demand on the health service and particularly the GP. However, they were also cautious over what they perceived to be self-treatment without guidance from a trusted source of information.

Conclusion: Key user focused priorities have been established for the development of a web-based self-management tool for people with joint pain. Future work will refine this tool with current and future participants and with healthcare professionals and academics.
Clarkson, Paul
476e6028-5270-49b8-996f-19d930e6abf6
Vassilev, Ivaylo
d76a5531-4ddc-4eb2-909b-a2a1068f05f3
Rogers, Anne
105eeebc-1899-4850-950e-385a51738eb7
Adams, Joanna
6e38b8bb-9467-4585-86e4-14062b02bcba
Clarkson, Paul
476e6028-5270-49b8-996f-19d930e6abf6
Vassilev, Ivaylo
d76a5531-4ddc-4eb2-909b-a2a1068f05f3
Rogers, Anne
105eeebc-1899-4850-950e-385a51738eb7
Adams, Joanna
6e38b8bb-9467-4585-86e4-14062b02bcba

Clarkson, Paul, Vassilev, Ivaylo, Rogers, Anne and Adams, Joanna (2019) Developing a new social networked self-management tool for people living with joint pain: identifying individuals’ needs and priorities. British Society of Rheumatology Conference, , Liverpool, United Kingdom.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)

Abstract

Background: Joint pain caused by osteoarthritis (OA) has a substantial impact on everyday life. The costs associated with managing OA are considerable for the individual and for society. Self-management support strategies may assist to mediate the individual costs and technology may contribute to their delivery. Self-management strategies may include the provision of accessible information about OA and the means to identify and engage with resources and opportunities for support from social network members. In doing so, people may be facilitated to access new and existing connections to mobilise support for the management of joint pain. Such approaches have been effective in supporting people to manage other long-term conditions.

Methods: This research aimed to develop a novel web-based resource for self-management of joint pain. To understand the needs and priorities of people living with joint pain for self-management support, three focus groups were undertaken in the community. Participants were asked to review two existing websites and provide feedback. The first website (www.myjointpain.org.au) provided health-based information and symptom advice, designed to be used independently. The second was a social network-mapping tool called Genie (genie.soton.ac.uk) designed to engage people to connections and activities, which was facilitated by the research team. Both are intended to be used to develop the intervention. The data from each focus group was recorded and transcribed, then coded and categorised to identify guiding principles for the content and usability of the intervention. Ethics approval was gained from the University of Southampton, Faculty of Health Sciences committee (Ref. 40268.A1).

Results: Eleven participants were recruited from three community groups. Five categories were identified, including: flexibility, complementarity, tailoring, introductions/engagement and self-management aims. Flexibility: Participants wanted the new site to be adaptable enough to meet their needs at different times. Therefore, some wanted health advice first, followed by social network support, while others wanted flexibility to choose based on their needs. Complementarity: Participants considered that the two websites were complementary and if brought together would allow people to find strategies and support to manage their joint pain. Tailoring: Tailoring was considered important to ensure relevance, trust and reassurance in the information presented. Introductions/engagement: The person or context of the introduction to the site was linked to perceived trust in the site content. Self-management aims: Participants considered that a web-based self-management tool could alleviate some of the demand on the health service and particularly the GP. However, they were also cautious over what they perceived to be self-treatment without guidance from a trusted source of information.

Conclusion: Key user focused priorities have been established for the development of a web-based self-management tool for people with joint pain. Future work will refine this tool with current and future participants and with healthcare professionals and academics.

This record has no associated files available for download.

More information

Published date: April 2019
Venue - Dates: British Society of Rheumatology Conference, , Liverpool, United Kingdom, 2014-04-29

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 433964
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/433964
PURE UUID: 3c5bb14b-c33f-4588-aa8c-5daa21e0ae16
ORCID for Joanna Adams: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1765-7060

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Sep 2019 16:30
Last modified: 10 Nov 2021 02:47

Export record

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×