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Levels of resilience and delivery of HIV care in response to urban violence and crime

Levels of resilience and delivery of HIV care in response to urban violence and crime
Levels of resilience and delivery of HIV care in response to urban violence and crime
Aims: to understand the impact of urban violence and crime on HIV care delivery.

Background: urban violence and crime can put pressure on the healthcare system and on nursing staff. Whilst there is research about the impact this has at the individual level, there is less research that places this in the context of the overall social eco‐system.

Design: a qualitative design using inductive thematic analysis.

Methods: between July 2016 ‐ February 2017, we conducted in‐depth interviews with 10 nurses working in two neighbourhoods with high levels of violence in Cape Town, South Africa.

Results: the effects of crime and violence were evident at multiple levels resulting in participants feeling “safe and unsafe” in a context where people view crime as endemic. Resilience emerged as a key concept in the findings. Resilience was apparent at individual, community, and organizational levels and enabled continued delivery of HIV care.

Conclusion: the findings demonstrate the potential role of resilience in the social eco‐health system required to sustain delivery of HIV care in the midst of urban violence and gangsterism.
Impact

This study examined the impact of and response to urban violence on HIV care delivery. The findings indicate that resilience manifests at all levels of the social eco‐system. Understanding the mechanisms employed to cope with endemic violence helps to address these challenges in the study setting, but also has a much wider application to other areas with endemic urban violence and crime.

crime, healthcare workers, HIV/AIDS, nurses, primary health care, resilience, urban violence
0309-2402
1723-1731
Cooper, Diane
30cc8596-e805-414d-b35d-f159fb305578
Green, Gill
c4ca2bb5-9ab7-4160-8940-bfbc30e5c394
Tembo, Doreen
def2592f-c1e8-42a6-bfec-81fe3620da03
Christie, Sarah
272e01c1-d278-4d4a-9963-b4466a94e5e7
Cooper, Diane
30cc8596-e805-414d-b35d-f159fb305578
Green, Gill
c4ca2bb5-9ab7-4160-8940-bfbc30e5c394
Tembo, Doreen
def2592f-c1e8-42a6-bfec-81fe3620da03
Christie, Sarah
272e01c1-d278-4d4a-9963-b4466a94e5e7

Cooper, Diane, Green, Gill, Tembo, Doreen and Christie, Sarah (2019) Levels of resilience and delivery of HIV care in response to urban violence and crime. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 75 (8), 1723-1731. (doi:10.1111/jan.14022).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Aims: to understand the impact of urban violence and crime on HIV care delivery.

Background: urban violence and crime can put pressure on the healthcare system and on nursing staff. Whilst there is research about the impact this has at the individual level, there is less research that places this in the context of the overall social eco‐system.

Design: a qualitative design using inductive thematic analysis.

Methods: between July 2016 ‐ February 2017, we conducted in‐depth interviews with 10 nurses working in two neighbourhoods with high levels of violence in Cape Town, South Africa.

Results: the effects of crime and violence were evident at multiple levels resulting in participants feeling “safe and unsafe” in a context where people view crime as endemic. Resilience emerged as a key concept in the findings. Resilience was apparent at individual, community, and organizational levels and enabled continued delivery of HIV care.

Conclusion: the findings demonstrate the potential role of resilience in the social eco‐health system required to sustain delivery of HIV care in the midst of urban violence and gangsterism.
Impact

This study examined the impact of and response to urban violence on HIV care delivery. The findings indicate that resilience manifests at all levels of the social eco‐system. Understanding the mechanisms employed to cope with endemic violence helps to address these challenges in the study setting, but also has a much wider application to other areas with endemic urban violence and crime.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 7 February 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 11 April 2019
Published date: August 2019
Alternative titles: 应对城市暴力和犯罪的复原力水平和提供艾滋病毒护理
Keywords: crime, healthcare workers, HIV/AIDS, nurses, primary health care, resilience, urban violence

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 434171
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/434171
ISSN: 0309-2402
PURE UUID: 7baf007b-cf11-469a-ab6a-8da4e2cf218d

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 13 Sep 2019 16:30
Last modified: 09 Nov 2021 15:59

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Contributors

Author: Diane Cooper
Author: Gill Green
Author: Doreen Tembo
Author: Sarah Christie

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