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Bullying and harassment and work-related stressors: evidence from British small and medium enterprises

Bullying and harassment and work-related stressors: evidence from British small and medium enterprises
Bullying and harassment and work-related stressors: evidence from British small and medium enterprises
This article examines the relationship between work-related stressors and bullying and harassment in British small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs). Using representative data from a national survey on employment rights and experiences (Fair Treatment at Work), this research identifies that bullying and harassment are just as prevalent in British SMEs as in larger organisations. Drawing upon the Management Standards of the Health and Safety Executive, a number of significant relationships with bullying and harassment are established. Work demands placed upon employees are positively related to bullying and harassment behaviours, while autonomy, manager support, peer support and clarity of role are negatively associated with such behaviours. The study considers implications for human resource practices in SMEs, and the risks of informal attitudes to these work-related stressors in contemporary workplaces are discussed
0266-2426
116-137
Lewis, Duncan
b9629286-d195-4186-8f94-968060b87555
Megicks, Phil
5330ca01-abb8-4e41-b079-07c1e7656336
Jones, Paul
b51472fd-cbaa-4297-97ee-fd0e47ea46e4
Lewis, Duncan
b9629286-d195-4186-8f94-968060b87555
Megicks, Phil
5330ca01-abb8-4e41-b079-07c1e7656336
Jones, Paul
b51472fd-cbaa-4297-97ee-fd0e47ea46e4

Lewis, Duncan, Megicks, Phil and Jones, Paul (2017) Bullying and harassment and work-related stressors: evidence from British small and medium enterprises. International Small Business Journal, 35 (1), 116-137. (doi:10.1177/0266242615624039).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This article examines the relationship between work-related stressors and bullying and harassment in British small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs). Using representative data from a national survey on employment rights and experiences (Fair Treatment at Work), this research identifies that bullying and harassment are just as prevalent in British SMEs as in larger organisations. Drawing upon the Management Standards of the Health and Safety Executive, a number of significant relationships with bullying and harassment are established. Work demands placed upon employees are positively related to bullying and harassment behaviours, while autonomy, manager support, peer support and clarity of role are negatively associated with such behaviours. The study considers implications for human resource practices in SMEs, and the risks of informal attitudes to these work-related stressors in contemporary workplaces are discussed

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ISBJ+Lewis+Megicks+Jones+2015 - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 28 January 2016
Published date: 1 February 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 434509
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/434509
ISSN: 0266-2426
PURE UUID: 96bbce63-0b55-4b05-b3e1-9604a27e11e1

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Date deposited: 25 Sep 2019 16:30
Last modified: 12 Nov 2021 19:22

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Contributors

Author: Duncan Lewis
Author: Phil Megicks
Author: Paul Jones

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