The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Investigating the validity and utility of the psychosis subgroups

Investigating the validity and utility of the psychosis subgroups
Investigating the validity and utility of the psychosis subgroups
The current system of classification of mental health diagnoses has been widely criticised. In particular, the diagnosis of schizophrenia has been highlighted as being essentially meaningless. Issues surrounding its validity and utility have been raised. In response to this, an alternative to the current system has been proposed: the psychosis subgroups. These subgroups, informed by the biopsychosocial, stress vulnerability model and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy approaches, are drug-related psychosis, traumatic psychosis, stress sensitivity psychosis and anxiety psychosis.

This thesis explores validity and utility of classifications within mental health, through the investigation of the psychosis subgroups. Three studies were designed to explore the validity and utility of the psychosis subgroups from the perspective of three main stakeholders in the use of mental health classification: researchers, service users and clinicians.

Study 1 explored the validity of the psychosis subgroups using a quantitative cross sectional study. A clinical sample was used to investigate concurrent validity. The hypothesis was not upheld and possible reasons for this are discussed.

Study 2 explored Professional Experts and Experts by Experience opinions about the validity and utility of psychosis subgroups using a Delphi study. A lack of consensus in many areas was found. Further descriptive data identified divergent opinions held by participants.

Study 3 used Grounded Theory to explore the opinions of Experts by Experience. A model of “uncertain knowing” in relation to the causes and explanations of psychosis was proposed. The implications and practical uses of this model are discussed.

This thesis provides a pragmatic, comprehensive and systematic exploration of the validity and utility of the psychosis subgroups. Whilst no conclusive evidence for the psychosis subgroups was found, the Grounded Theory model and methodology used may have practical implications for further investigation and exploration of mental health classification.
University of Southampton
Graves, Elizabeth
b2590552-7032-4a1d-a605-7e5e12d608ac
Graves, Elizabeth
b2590552-7032-4a1d-a605-7e5e12d608ac
Kingdon, David
14cdc422-10b4-4b2d-88ec-24fde5f4329b
Kimber, Alan
40ba3a19-bbe3-47b6-9a8d-68ebf4cea774
Stack, Emma L
a6c29a03-e851-4598-a565-6a92bb581e70

Graves, Elizabeth (2018) Investigating the validity and utility of the psychosis subgroups. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 289pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

The current system of classification of mental health diagnoses has been widely criticised. In particular, the diagnosis of schizophrenia has been highlighted as being essentially meaningless. Issues surrounding its validity and utility have been raised. In response to this, an alternative to the current system has been proposed: the psychosis subgroups. These subgroups, informed by the biopsychosocial, stress vulnerability model and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy approaches, are drug-related psychosis, traumatic psychosis, stress sensitivity psychosis and anxiety psychosis.

This thesis explores validity and utility of classifications within mental health, through the investigation of the psychosis subgroups. Three studies were designed to explore the validity and utility of the psychosis subgroups from the perspective of three main stakeholders in the use of mental health classification: researchers, service users and clinicians.

Study 1 explored the validity of the psychosis subgroups using a quantitative cross sectional study. A clinical sample was used to investigate concurrent validity. The hypothesis was not upheld and possible reasons for this are discussed.

Study 2 explored Professional Experts and Experts by Experience opinions about the validity and utility of psychosis subgroups using a Delphi study. A lack of consensus in many areas was found. Further descriptive data identified divergent opinions held by participants.

Study 3 used Grounded Theory to explore the opinions of Experts by Experience. A model of “uncertain knowing” in relation to the causes and explanations of psychosis was proposed. The implications and practical uses of this model are discussed.

This thesis provides a pragmatic, comprehensive and systematic exploration of the validity and utility of the psychosis subgroups. Whilst no conclusive evidence for the psychosis subgroups was found, the Grounded Theory model and methodology used may have practical implications for further investigation and exploration of mental health classification.

Text
Psychosis Subgroups Thesis E Graves - Version of Record
Available under License University of Southampton Thesis Licence.
Download (4MB)

More information

Published date: July 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 434535
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/434535
PURE UUID: f1b65dd4-f153-4f93-97b2-f64a4f15defa

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 30 Sep 2019 16:30
Last modified: 30 Sep 2019 16:30

Export record

Contributors

Author: Elizabeth Graves
Thesis advisor: David Kingdon
Thesis advisor: Alan Kimber
Thesis advisor: Emma L Stack

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×