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Health behavior change and complementary medicine use: National Health Interview Survey 2012

Health behavior change and complementary medicine use: National Health Interview Survey 2012
Health behavior change and complementary medicine use: National Health Interview Survey 2012
Background and objectives: Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use has been associated with preventive health behaviors. However, the role of CAM use in patients’ health behaviors remains unclear. This study aimed to determine the extent to which patients report that CAM use motivates them to make changes to their health behaviors. Materials and Methods: This secondary analysis of 2012 National Health Interview Survey data involved 10,201 CAM users living in the United States who identified up to three CAM therapies most important to their health. Analyses assessed the extent to which participants reported that their CAM use motivated positive health behavior changes, specifically: eating healthier, eating more organic foods, cutting back/stopping drinking alcohol, cutting back/quitting smoking cigarettes, and/or exercising more regularly. Results: Overall, 45.4% of CAM users reported being motivated by CAM to make positive health behavior changes, including exercising more regularly (34.9%), eating healthier (31.4%), eating more organic foods (17.2%), reducing/stopping smoking (16.6% of smokers), or reducing/stopping drinking alcohol (8.7% of drinkers). Individual CAM therapies motivated positive health behavior changes in 22% (massage) to 81% (special diets) of users. People were more likely to report being motivated to change health behaviors if they were: aged 18–64 compared to those aged over 65 years; of female gender; not in a relationship; of Hispanic or Black ethnicity, compared to White; reporting at least college education, compared to people with less than high school education; without health insurance. Conclusions: A sizeable proportion of respondents were motivated by their CAM use to undertake health behavior changes. CAM practices and practitioners could help improve patients’ health behavior and have potentially significant implications for public health and preventive medicine initiatives; this warrants further research attention.
1010-660X
Bishop, Felicity
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Lauche, Romy
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Cramer, Holger
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Pinto, Jonquil W
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Leung, Brenda
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Hall, Helen
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Leach, Matthew
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Chung, Vincent
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Sundberg, Tobias
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Zhang, Yan
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Steel, Amie
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Ward, Lesley
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Sibbritt, David
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Adams, Jon
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Bishop, Felicity
1f5429c5-325f-4ac4-aae3-6ba85d079928
Lauche, Romy
532e2ee3-85dc-4862-82ca-b03e40b628d9
Cramer, Holger
c3644d93-d7d6-49c4-ae6e-f47d6e40a6a8
Pinto, Jonquil W
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Leung, Brenda
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Hall, Helen
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Leach, Matthew
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Chung, Vincent
40c664ad-bb44-468d-9ed4-b21a11f6af0c
Sundberg, Tobias
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Zhang, Yan
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Steel, Amie
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Ward, Lesley
be95f3f8-8585-4ccc-aef0-3550e9825a4d
Sibbritt, David
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Adams, Jon
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Bishop, Felicity, Lauche, Romy, Cramer, Holger, Pinto, Jonquil W, Leung, Brenda, Hall, Helen, Leach, Matthew, Chung, Vincent, Sundberg, Tobias, Zhang, Yan, Steel, Amie, Ward, Lesley, Sibbritt, David and Adams, Jon (2019) Health behavior change and complementary medicine use: National Health Interview Survey 2012. Medicina, 55 (10), [362]. (doi:10.3390/medicina55100632).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background and objectives: Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use has been associated with preventive health behaviors. However, the role of CAM use in patients’ health behaviors remains unclear. This study aimed to determine the extent to which patients report that CAM use motivates them to make changes to their health behaviors. Materials and Methods: This secondary analysis of 2012 National Health Interview Survey data involved 10,201 CAM users living in the United States who identified up to three CAM therapies most important to their health. Analyses assessed the extent to which participants reported that their CAM use motivated positive health behavior changes, specifically: eating healthier, eating more organic foods, cutting back/stopping drinking alcohol, cutting back/quitting smoking cigarettes, and/or exercising more regularly. Results: Overall, 45.4% of CAM users reported being motivated by CAM to make positive health behavior changes, including exercising more regularly (34.9%), eating healthier (31.4%), eating more organic foods (17.2%), reducing/stopping smoking (16.6% of smokers), or reducing/stopping drinking alcohol (8.7% of drinkers). Individual CAM therapies motivated positive health behavior changes in 22% (massage) to 81% (special diets) of users. People were more likely to report being motivated to change health behaviors if they were: aged 18–64 compared to those aged over 65 years; of female gender; not in a relationship; of Hispanic or Black ethnicity, compared to White; reporting at least college education, compared to people with less than high school education; without health insurance. Conclusions: A sizeable proportion of respondents were motivated by their CAM use to undertake health behavior changes. CAM practices and practitioners could help improve patients’ health behavior and have potentially significant implications for public health and preventive medicine initiatives; this warrants further research attention.

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Accepted/In Press date: 17 September 2019
Published date: 24 September 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 434604
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/434604
ISSN: 1010-660X
PURE UUID: faa99502-0150-49b1-829c-d30b028bfe7e
ORCID for Felicity Bishop: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8737-6662

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Date deposited: 03 Oct 2019 16:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 01:48

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Contributors

Author: Felicity Bishop ORCID iD
Author: Romy Lauche
Author: Holger Cramer
Author: Jonquil W Pinto
Author: Brenda Leung
Author: Helen Hall
Author: Matthew Leach
Author: Vincent Chung
Author: Tobias Sundberg
Author: Yan Zhang
Author: Amie Steel
Author: Lesley Ward
Author: David Sibbritt
Author: Jon Adams

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