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Attitudes towards homeless people, beliefs and burnout among NHS staff in physical and mental health work settings

Attitudes towards homeless people, beliefs and burnout among NHS staff in physical and mental health work settings
Attitudes towards homeless people, beliefs and burnout among NHS staff in physical and mental health work settings
Previous research has highlighted a strong association between mental illness and repeat homelessness. Despite this, there is a dearth of literature exploring the processes and mechanisms that underpin this relationship. The first chapter of this research aimed to address this gap by exploring how mental health problems are implicated in the maintenance of repeat homelessness, using realist synthesis. This realist review systematically appraised theoretical and empirical literature across a number of contexts, and iterative searches highlighted 37 relevant and rigorous articles eligible for inclusion. Themes across the literature were abstracted to develop a heuristic model of how mental health problems maintain repeat homelessness via two interacting pathways; social isolation and maladaptive coping (substance-use, gambling, antisocial behaviour). Implications for the findings are discussed and limitations are explored.

Given that staff attitudes are a significant factor impacting accessibility and engagement of marginalised client-groups including homeless clients, the second chapter of this research aimed to explore factors that contribute to stigmatising attitudes in staff working across mental health and physical health settings. Sixty-six health professionals were recruited from a range of NHS settings and were required to complete an online survey exploring demographic factors, psychological factors (attitudes, burnout, evaluative beliefs, effective working with complex clients, stress, support) and professional factors (training and experience). T-tests revealed significant differences between staff with mental health experience compared to physical health staff, such that physical health staff showed more stigmatising attitudes towards homeless clients, lower effective working with complex clients, higher levels of depersonalisation and poorer perceived levels of support. Univariate and multivariate analyses demonstrated significant associations between psychological and professional factors with attitudes, burnout and effective working with complex clients. Clinical implications are discussed and directions for future research are considered.
University of Southampton
Raman, Shalini
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Raman, Shalini
8b441cb8-ca9d-4e66-a060-9eac86ff2265
Maguire, Nicholas
ebc88e0a-3c1e-4b3a-88ac-e1dad740011b
Kirby, Sarah
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Raman, Shalini (2019) Attitudes towards homeless people, beliefs and burnout among NHS staff in physical and mental health work settings. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 168pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Previous research has highlighted a strong association between mental illness and repeat homelessness. Despite this, there is a dearth of literature exploring the processes and mechanisms that underpin this relationship. The first chapter of this research aimed to address this gap by exploring how mental health problems are implicated in the maintenance of repeat homelessness, using realist synthesis. This realist review systematically appraised theoretical and empirical literature across a number of contexts, and iterative searches highlighted 37 relevant and rigorous articles eligible for inclusion. Themes across the literature were abstracted to develop a heuristic model of how mental health problems maintain repeat homelessness via two interacting pathways; social isolation and maladaptive coping (substance-use, gambling, antisocial behaviour). Implications for the findings are discussed and limitations are explored.

Given that staff attitudes are a significant factor impacting accessibility and engagement of marginalised client-groups including homeless clients, the second chapter of this research aimed to explore factors that contribute to stigmatising attitudes in staff working across mental health and physical health settings. Sixty-six health professionals were recruited from a range of NHS settings and were required to complete an online survey exploring demographic factors, psychological factors (attitudes, burnout, evaluative beliefs, effective working with complex clients, stress, support) and professional factors (training and experience). T-tests revealed significant differences between staff with mental health experience compared to physical health staff, such that physical health staff showed more stigmatising attitudes towards homeless clients, lower effective working with complex clients, higher levels of depersonalisation and poorer perceived levels of support. Univariate and multivariate analyses demonstrated significant associations between psychological and professional factors with attitudes, burnout and effective working with complex clients. Clinical implications are discussed and directions for future research are considered.

Text
Shalini Raman Final Thesis - Version of Record
Restricted to Repository staff only until 5 September 2022.
Available under License University of Southampton Thesis Licence.

More information

Published date: May 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 434616
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/434616
PURE UUID: f70d56b3-cc39-4944-a510-f0759bc1e45a
ORCID for Nicholas Maguire: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4295-8068
ORCID for Sarah Kirby: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1759-1356

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 03 Oct 2019 16:30
Last modified: 04 Oct 2019 00:37

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Contributors

Author: Shalini Raman
Thesis advisor: Nicholas Maguire ORCID iD
Thesis advisor: Sarah Kirby ORCID iD

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