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L2 incidental vocabulary learning and retention through different modalities of audio-visual input

L2 incidental vocabulary learning and retention through different modalities of audio-visual input
L2 incidental vocabulary learning and retention through different modalities of audio-visual input
While the bulk of previous studies on incidental vocabulary learning through audio-visual materials have looked at the differential effects of some input modalities (e.g., L1 subtitles vs L2 captions), little research has examined the effects of other important modalities of audio-visual input. The present research study investigates L2 incidental vocabulary short-term learning and long-term retention in four different audio-visual input conditions. More precisely, adopting a quasi-experimental research design, this study compares the effects of four modalities of audio-visual input: video, audio, and caption (VAC), video and audio (VA), caption and audio, (CA), and audio only (A only) on incidental learning and retention of knowledge of 36 target words’ spoken form recognition, meaning recall, and meaning recognition. Additionally, the study examines the predictive roles of an item-related variable (frequency of occurrence) and a learner-related variable (working memory) in incidental vocabulary learning through the four different input conditions.

The study used a range of data collection methods. Vocabulary knowledge was assessed through three vocabulary tests: spoken form recognition, spoken meaning recall, and spoken meaning recognition. These were administered at three different time points as, pre-tests, immediate post-tests, and delayed post-tests. Working memory capacity was measured using two verbal tests, (forward digit recall and backward digit recall) and two visuospatial tests, (dot matrix and odd one out).

The study demonstrated that the four audio-visual input conditions resulted in L2 incidental vocabulary learning of the three vocabulary knowledge dimensions. The findings showed that the four modalities of audio-visual input had differential effects on incidental short-term learning of the three vocabulary knowledge types. The captioning conditions (CA and VAC) were more effective than the non-captioning conditions (VA and A only) for fostering form learning. The visual condition (VA) was the most effective condition for promoting meaning knowledge. Additionally, large attrition rates of the three vocabulary knowledge dimensions were found across the four experimental groups. The results also demonstrated that the effect of frequency of occurrence varied based on the modalities of audio-visual input and the target word knowledge aspects. In relation to the role of working memory, the findings indicated that individual differences in working memory capacity did not account for the variations in the vocabulary scores on the immediate and delayed post-tests. A number of pedagogical implications regarding the effects of the different modalities of audio-visual input on vocabulary learning and retention are presented.
University of Southampton
Alshumrani, Hassan Ahmed
879f6b0e-496e-4be9-bf38-46cef18f9f70
Alshumrani, Hassan Ahmed
879f6b0e-496e-4be9-bf38-46cef18f9f70
Rule, Sarah
81970997-971e-4613-adf5-69a6a627819c
Porter, Alison
978474c5-8b0b-4dc6-8463-3fd68162d0cd

Alshumrani, Hassan Ahmed (2019) L2 incidental vocabulary learning and retention through different modalities of audio-visual input. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 275pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

While the bulk of previous studies on incidental vocabulary learning through audio-visual materials have looked at the differential effects of some input modalities (e.g., L1 subtitles vs L2 captions), little research has examined the effects of other important modalities of audio-visual input. The present research study investigates L2 incidental vocabulary short-term learning and long-term retention in four different audio-visual input conditions. More precisely, adopting a quasi-experimental research design, this study compares the effects of four modalities of audio-visual input: video, audio, and caption (VAC), video and audio (VA), caption and audio, (CA), and audio only (A only) on incidental learning and retention of knowledge of 36 target words’ spoken form recognition, meaning recall, and meaning recognition. Additionally, the study examines the predictive roles of an item-related variable (frequency of occurrence) and a learner-related variable (working memory) in incidental vocabulary learning through the four different input conditions.

The study used a range of data collection methods. Vocabulary knowledge was assessed through three vocabulary tests: spoken form recognition, spoken meaning recall, and spoken meaning recognition. These were administered at three different time points as, pre-tests, immediate post-tests, and delayed post-tests. Working memory capacity was measured using two verbal tests, (forward digit recall and backward digit recall) and two visuospatial tests, (dot matrix and odd one out).

The study demonstrated that the four audio-visual input conditions resulted in L2 incidental vocabulary learning of the three vocabulary knowledge dimensions. The findings showed that the four modalities of audio-visual input had differential effects on incidental short-term learning of the three vocabulary knowledge types. The captioning conditions (CA and VAC) were more effective than the non-captioning conditions (VA and A only) for fostering form learning. The visual condition (VA) was the most effective condition for promoting meaning knowledge. Additionally, large attrition rates of the three vocabulary knowledge dimensions were found across the four experimental groups. The results also demonstrated that the effect of frequency of occurrence varied based on the modalities of audio-visual input and the target word knowledge aspects. In relation to the role of working memory, the findings indicated that individual differences in working memory capacity did not account for the variations in the vocabulary scores on the immediate and delayed post-tests. A number of pedagogical implications regarding the effects of the different modalities of audio-visual input on vocabulary learning and retention are presented.

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Hassan Alshumrani Thesis - Version of Record
Restricted to Repository staff only until 10 September 2021.
Available under License University of Southampton Thesis Licence.

More information

Published date: April 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 434623
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/434623
PURE UUID: 651884f2-83dd-49c6-bc01-260c622b4740
ORCID for Alison Porter: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8462-1909

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 03 Oct 2019 16:30
Last modified: 04 Oct 2019 00:33

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Contributors

Author: Hassan Ahmed Alshumrani
Thesis advisor: Sarah Rule
Thesis advisor: Alison Porter ORCID iD

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