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Dealing with dictators

Dealing with dictators
Dealing with dictators
Dictatorship is a great stain upon our world. Dictators treat their subjects purely as means to their own aggrandizement, and not as agents with a right to participate in self‐government. Moreover, dictators frequently, though not always, commit great harms: starting wars, brutalizing dissidents, persecuting minorities, and squandering resources which could otherwise be used to advance the common good.

The question of how outsiders—including outsiders living in societies committed in word, if not always in deed, to the core principles of liberal democracy—ought to engage with or respond to dictatorial regimes, though, is a thorny one. Difficult questions arise in the context of overseas aid, for instance, as states and NGOs grapple with how to act in a situation where their support might bolster repressive regimes. But the focus here will be upon international trade. In recent years, a number of scholars have argued that for liberal democracies to allow their citizens and corporations to trade with dictatorships can also serve to entrench dictators' positions, and even make the emergence of dictatorships more likely. ...
0963-8016
307-331
Armstrong, Christopher
2fbfa0a3-9183-4562-9370-0f6441df90d2
Armstrong, Christopher
2fbfa0a3-9183-4562-9370-0f6441df90d2

Armstrong, Christopher (2020) Dealing with dictators. Journal of Political Philosophy, 28 (3), 307-331. (doi:10.1111/jopp.12206).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Dictatorship is a great stain upon our world. Dictators treat their subjects purely as means to their own aggrandizement, and not as agents with a right to participate in self‐government. Moreover, dictators frequently, though not always, commit great harms: starting wars, brutalizing dissidents, persecuting minorities, and squandering resources which could otherwise be used to advance the common good.

The question of how outsiders—including outsiders living in societies committed in word, if not always in deed, to the core principles of liberal democracy—ought to engage with or respond to dictatorial regimes, though, is a thorny one. Difficult questions arise in the context of overseas aid, for instance, as states and NGOs grapple with how to act in a situation where their support might bolster repressive regimes. But the focus here will be upon international trade. In recent years, a number of scholars have argued that for liberal democracies to allow their citizens and corporations to trade with dictatorships can also serve to entrench dictators' positions, and even make the emergence of dictatorships more likely. ...

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Accepted/In Press date: 25 September 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 24 October 2019
Published date: September 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 434658
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/434658
ISSN: 0963-8016
PURE UUID: c77b2d1a-1e91-475e-9641-7b86e0625c21
ORCID for Christopher Armstrong: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7462-5316

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Date deposited: 04 Oct 2019 16:30
Last modified: 28 Apr 2022 04:13

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