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古生态记录揭示的长江中下游太白湖生态系统稳态转换过程

古生态记录揭示的长江中下游太白湖生态系统稳态转换过程
古生态记录揭示的长江中下游太白湖生态系统稳态转换过程

Shallow lakes in the middle and lower Yangtze River Basin are greatly influenced by human activities during the last century, subsequently ecological regime shifts have occured and some ecosystem services are degraded in some shallow lakes. In order to provide more scientific and efficient lake management, it is necessarily urgent to understand the transforming process of the lake ecosystems. In this study, we focus on a typical eutrophic shallow lake sited in the middle reach of Yangtze River Basin, namely Lake Taibai, and combine its related geochemistry proxies, grain size and fossil diatom assemblages from a sediment core dated in 210 Pb and 137 Cs chronology based on paleolimnology with the basin's historical documents and monitoring data, to analyze specific regime shifts occurred in its ecosystem and changes of feedbacks inside driven by hydrodynamic changes and nutrient enrichement process. Results of diatom assemblages using STARS, a T-test based algorithm, revealed that at least two ecological shifts took place in the late 1950s and 1990s, respectively. The sudden shift in the late 1950s is supposed to be influenced hydrological change caused by dam and sluice constructions in 1950s and another shift in the late 1990s should be a critical transition due to the alternation of cultured fish community and consistent nutrient enrichment, which led to gradual decrease in ecosystem resilience in Lake Taibai. Through analyzing the changes of feedbacks among main function groups in the ecosystem influenced by the change of hydrodynamics and euthrophication, we can have a deeper understand of the process of ecosystem structural changes disturbed by anthropogenic driversand lay the fundation for building a shallow lake ecosystem dynamic model in future researches.

Diatom, Feedbacks, Lake Taibai, Middle and lower reaches of Yangtze River Basin, Regime shifts, Shallow lakes
1003-5427
1381-1390
Zhao, Yanjie
84baf146-1a1f-46a7-9c03-66e5dfb68401
Wang, Rong
d87aad80-4e91-404c-bc22-5a591ceee83c
Yang, Xiangdong
7fb74be0-db37-442a-bf12-9ce6018f41fb
Dong, Xuhui
d6e244b3-d85d-4528-a78a-e25dee6a6852
Xu, Min
54cc2f17-f40e-4477-86e6-42751e7dbff6
Zhao, Yanjie
84baf146-1a1f-46a7-9c03-66e5dfb68401
Wang, Rong
d87aad80-4e91-404c-bc22-5a591ceee83c
Yang, Xiangdong
7fb74be0-db37-442a-bf12-9ce6018f41fb
Dong, Xuhui
d6e244b3-d85d-4528-a78a-e25dee6a6852
Xu, Min
54cc2f17-f40e-4477-86e6-42751e7dbff6

Zhao, Yanjie, Wang, Rong, Yang, Xiangdong, Dong, Xuhui and Xu, Min (2016) 古生态记录揭示的长江中下游太白湖生态系统稳态转换过程. Hupo Kexue/Journal of Lake Sciences, 28 (6), 1381-1390. (doi:10.18307/2016.0624).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Shallow lakes in the middle and lower Yangtze River Basin are greatly influenced by human activities during the last century, subsequently ecological regime shifts have occured and some ecosystem services are degraded in some shallow lakes. In order to provide more scientific and efficient lake management, it is necessarily urgent to understand the transforming process of the lake ecosystems. In this study, we focus on a typical eutrophic shallow lake sited in the middle reach of Yangtze River Basin, namely Lake Taibai, and combine its related geochemistry proxies, grain size and fossil diatom assemblages from a sediment core dated in 210 Pb and 137 Cs chronology based on paleolimnology with the basin's historical documents and monitoring data, to analyze specific regime shifts occurred in its ecosystem and changes of feedbacks inside driven by hydrodynamic changes and nutrient enrichement process. Results of diatom assemblages using STARS, a T-test based algorithm, revealed that at least two ecological shifts took place in the late 1950s and 1990s, respectively. The sudden shift in the late 1950s is supposed to be influenced hydrological change caused by dam and sluice constructions in 1950s and another shift in the late 1990s should be a critical transition due to the alternation of cultured fish community and consistent nutrient enrichment, which led to gradual decrease in ecosystem resilience in Lake Taibai. Through analyzing the changes of feedbacks among main function groups in the ecosystem influenced by the change of hydrodynamics and euthrophication, we can have a deeper understand of the process of ecosystem structural changes disturbed by anthropogenic driversand lay the fundation for building a shallow lake ecosystem dynamic model in future researches.

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More information

Published date: 6 October 2016
Alternative titles: Regime shifts revealed by paleoecological records in Lake Taibai's ecosystem in the middle and lower Yangtze River Basin during the last century
Keywords: Diatom, Feedbacks, Lake Taibai, Middle and lower reaches of Yangtze River Basin, Regime shifts, Shallow lakes

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 434660
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/434660
ISSN: 1003-5427
PURE UUID: 6cf3986d-bd45-4f35-9803-253124d2574b
ORCID for Yanjie Zhao: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9307-8138

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 04 Oct 2019 16:30
Last modified: 10 Nov 2021 02:33

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Contributors

Author: Yanjie Zhao ORCID iD
Author: Rong Wang
Author: Xiangdong Yang
Author: Xuhui Dong
Author: Min Xu

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