The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Where there is wine there is a way: lessons from ‘Brexit-like’ events in the medieval and early modern period

Where there is wine there is a way: lessons from ‘Brexit-like’ events in the medieval and early modern period
Where there is wine there is a way: lessons from ‘Brexit-like’ events in the medieval and early modern period
he decision in 2016 by the UK to leave the EU sent shockwaves throughout Europe, raising questions about Britain’s future trading relationship and the potential impact on the domestic economy. The debate is polarised, with ‘remainers’ claiming that Brexit will have a continuing negative impact on the UK’s long-term future while ‘leavers’ argue that the UK will quickly develop new trading, economic, and financial opportunities that will more than compensate for any short-term disruption. Although this question will not be answered for many years, we may be able to learn some lessons from history by examining the impact of earlier Brexit-like events on England’s economic and social history. The medieval and early modern English economy was closely integrated into wider European networks of trade and finance. Therefore, breaks with this network (for example during the Hundred Years War or Reformation) were ‘Brexit-like’ as they interrupted pre-existing overseas financial and trading networks, which then had to be either re-forged or replaced once that crisis had passed. The following case study will explore the some of the economic impacts of the Anglo-French war of 1512-1514 on the port of Plymouth.
Brexit, Wine, Henry VIII
Lambert, Craig
ea7c6f02-8eff-4627-bfac-c6f8f26873a7
Adrian Bell
Tony Moore
Lambert, Craig
ea7c6f02-8eff-4627-bfac-c6f8f26873a7

Lambert, Craig , Adrian Bell and Tony Moore (2019) Where there is wine there is a way: lessons from ‘Brexit-like’ events in the medieval and early modern period. History and Policy.

Record type: Article

Abstract

he decision in 2016 by the UK to leave the EU sent shockwaves throughout Europe, raising questions about Britain’s future trading relationship and the potential impact on the domestic economy. The debate is polarised, with ‘remainers’ claiming that Brexit will have a continuing negative impact on the UK’s long-term future while ‘leavers’ argue that the UK will quickly develop new trading, economic, and financial opportunities that will more than compensate for any short-term disruption. Although this question will not be answered for many years, we may be able to learn some lessons from history by examining the impact of earlier Brexit-like events on England’s economic and social history. The medieval and early modern English economy was closely integrated into wider European networks of trade and finance. Therefore, breaks with this network (for example during the Hundred Years War or Reformation) were ‘Brexit-like’ as they interrupted pre-existing overseas financial and trading networks, which then had to be either re-forged or replaced once that crisis had passed. The following case study will explore the some of the economic impacts of the Anglo-French war of 1512-1514 on the port of Plymouth.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 3 October 2019
Keywords: Brexit, Wine, Henry VIII

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 434765
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/434765
PURE UUID: f1d6c3e3-3604-4fa9-8a3f-0d0350de81a9

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Oct 2019 16:30
Last modified: 13 Aug 2020 16:36

Export record

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×