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Use of a spatial scan statistic to identify clusters of births occurring outside Ghanaian health facilities for targeted intervention

Use of a spatial scan statistic to identify clusters of births occurring outside Ghanaian health facilities for targeted intervention
Use of a spatial scan statistic to identify clusters of births occurring outside Ghanaian health facilities for targeted intervention
OBJECTIVE:

To identify and evaluate clusters of births that occurred outside health facilities in Ghana for targeted intervention.


METHODS:

A retrospective study was conducted using a convenience sample of live births registered in Ghanaian health facilities from January 1 to December 31, 2014. Data were extracted from the district health information system. A spatial scan statistic was used to investigate clusters of home births through a discrete Poisson probability model. Scanning with a circular spatial window was conducted only for clusters with high rates of such deliveries. The district was used as the geographic unit of analysis. The likelihood P value was estimated using Monte Carlo simulations.


RESULTS:

Ten statistically significant clusters with a high rate of home birth were identified. The relative risks ranged from 1.43 ("least likely" cluster; P=0.001) to 1.95 ("most likely" cluster; P=0.001). The relative risks of the top five "most likely" clusters ranged from 1.68 to 1.95; these clusters were located in Ashanti, Brong Ahafo, and the Western, Eastern, and Greater regions of Accra.


CONCLUSION:

Health facility records, geospatial techniques, and geographic information systems provided locally relevant information to assist policy makers in delivering targeted interventions to small geographic areas.

Circular spatial window, Clusters, District health information system, Geographic information system, Home births, Spatial scan statistic
0020-7292
221-224
Bosomprah, Samuel
9cf510bb-1817-4fcb-b8dc-6250845a7515
Dotse-Gborgbortsi, Winfred
11fe21e7-431a-442b-a8c7-6a7cb05176d9
Aboagye, Patrick
dea8b3b4-41ad-4c4c-8317-d8f1de5f8b66
Matthews, Zoe
ebaee878-8cb8-415f-8aa1-3af2c3856f55
Bosomprah, Samuel
9cf510bb-1817-4fcb-b8dc-6250845a7515
Dotse-Gborgbortsi, Winfred
11fe21e7-431a-442b-a8c7-6a7cb05176d9
Aboagye, Patrick
dea8b3b4-41ad-4c4c-8317-d8f1de5f8b66
Matthews, Zoe
ebaee878-8cb8-415f-8aa1-3af2c3856f55

Bosomprah, Samuel, Dotse-Gborgbortsi, Winfred, Aboagye, Patrick and Matthews, Zoe (2016) Use of a spatial scan statistic to identify clusters of births occurring outside Ghanaian health facilities for targeted intervention. International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics, 135 (2), 221-224. (doi:10.1016/j.ijgo.2016.04.016).

Record type: Article

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To identify and evaluate clusters of births that occurred outside health facilities in Ghana for targeted intervention.


METHODS:

A retrospective study was conducted using a convenience sample of live births registered in Ghanaian health facilities from January 1 to December 31, 2014. Data were extracted from the district health information system. A spatial scan statistic was used to investigate clusters of home births through a discrete Poisson probability model. Scanning with a circular spatial window was conducted only for clusters with high rates of such deliveries. The district was used as the geographic unit of analysis. The likelihood P value was estimated using Monte Carlo simulations.


RESULTS:

Ten statistically significant clusters with a high rate of home birth were identified. The relative risks ranged from 1.43 ("least likely" cluster; P=0.001) to 1.95 ("most likely" cluster; P=0.001). The relative risks of the top five "most likely" clusters ranged from 1.68 to 1.95; these clusters were located in Ashanti, Brong Ahafo, and the Western, Eastern, and Greater regions of Accra.


CONCLUSION:

Health facility records, geospatial techniques, and geographic information systems provided locally relevant information to assist policy makers in delivering targeted interventions to small geographic areas.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 15 July 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 2 December 2016
Keywords: Circular spatial window, Clusters, District health information system, Geographic information system, Home births, Spatial scan statistic

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 434831
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/434831
ISSN: 0020-7292
PURE UUID: 36a6c17e-c5f2-4ed0-b234-80551d9b2801
ORCID for Winfred Dotse-Gborgbortsi: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7627-1809

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 Oct 2019 16:30
Last modified: 03 Dec 2019 01:20

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Contributors

Author: Samuel Bosomprah
Author: Patrick Aboagye
Author: Zoe Matthews

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