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Nonlinear model predictive control applied to multivariable thermal and chemical control of selective catalytic reduction aftertreatment

Nonlinear model predictive control applied to multivariable thermal and chemical control of selective catalytic reduction aftertreatment
Nonlinear model predictive control applied to multivariable thermal and chemical control of selective catalytic reduction aftertreatment
Manufacturers of diesel engines are under increasing pressure to meet progressively stricter NOx emissions limits. A key NOx abatement technology is selective catalytic reduction (SCR) in which ammonia, aided by a catalyst, reacts with NOx in the exhaust stream to produce nitrogen and water. The conversion efficiency is temperature dependent: at low temperature, reaction rates are temperature limited, resulting in suboptimal NOx removal, whereas at high temperatures, they are mass transfer limited. Maintaining sufficiently high temperature to allow maximal conversion is a challenge, particularly after cold start, as well as during conditions in which exhaust heat is insufficient, such as periods of low load or idling. In this work, a nonlinear model predictive controller simultaneously manages urea injection and power to an electric catalyst heater, in the presence of constraints.
25 Model Predictive Control, Selective Catalytic Reduction, Diesel Aftertreatment Controls
1468-0874
1017-1024
Sowman, Jonathan
2614b117-1ef8-4082-acdb-fa428239757c
Laila, Dina Shona
41aa5cf9-3ec2-4fdf-970d-a0a349bfd90c
Cruden, Andrew
ed709997-4402-49a7-9ad5-f4f3c62d29ab
Sowman, Jonathan
2614b117-1ef8-4082-acdb-fa428239757c
Laila, Dina Shona
41aa5cf9-3ec2-4fdf-970d-a0a349bfd90c
Cruden, Andrew
ed709997-4402-49a7-9ad5-f4f3c62d29ab

Sowman, Jonathan, Laila, Dina Shona and Cruden, Andrew (2019) Nonlinear model predictive control applied to multivariable thermal and chemical control of selective catalytic reduction aftertreatment. International Journal of Engine Research, 20 (10), 1017-1024. (doi:10.1177/1468087419859103).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Manufacturers of diesel engines are under increasing pressure to meet progressively stricter NOx emissions limits. A key NOx abatement technology is selective catalytic reduction (SCR) in which ammonia, aided by a catalyst, reacts with NOx in the exhaust stream to produce nitrogen and water. The conversion efficiency is temperature dependent: at low temperature, reaction rates are temperature limited, resulting in suboptimal NOx removal, whereas at high temperatures, they are mass transfer limited. Maintaining sufficiently high temperature to allow maximal conversion is a challenge, particularly after cold start, as well as during conditions in which exhaust heat is insufficient, such as periods of low load or idling. In this work, a nonlinear model predictive controller simultaneously manages urea injection and power to an electric catalyst heater, in the presence of constraints.

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IJER-17-0245-Final - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 30 May 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 26 June 2019
Published date: 1 December 2019
Keywords: 25 Model Predictive Control, Selective Catalytic Reduction, Diesel Aftertreatment Controls

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 434832
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/434832
ISSN: 1468-0874
PURE UUID: f06b7776-90d2-4a78-9e7f-87e48cafd541
ORCID for Andrew Cruden: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3236-2535

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 Oct 2019 16:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 02:01

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