The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

Influence of contact area on the sliding friction and wear behaviour of an electrochemical jet textured Al-Si alloy

Influence of contact area on the sliding friction and wear behaviour of an electrochemical jet textured Al-Si alloy
Influence of contact area on the sliding friction and wear behaviour of an electrochemical jet textured Al-Si alloy
Environmental legislation continues to drive optimisation of internal combustion engines in the automotive sector in an effort to reduce harmful emissions and promote fuel efficiency. Significant frictional losses occur at the ring pack, prompting research on reducing sliding friction at the ring – liner interface through the use of surface texturing. This study assesses the influence of contact area on the friction and wear behaviour of light-weight monolithic hyper-eutectic Al-Si alloy with a textured surface generated by electrochemical jet texturing. Flat rectangular samples were prepared from a cast cylinder liner via electro-discharge machining and flat lapped to 6 µm diamond finish prior to immersion in a 1 mol solution of NaOH for 120 s to simulate the mechanical honing process. Surfaces were electrochemically jet textured using a 2.3 mol solution of NaCl and current density of 220 A/cm2. An offset array of 1.3 × 0.3 mm rectangular features at 1.2 mm spacing was created with an average depth of 39 µm. Lubricated reciprocating sliding was carried out at a stroke length of 25 mm in a bath of PAO (4 cSt) at 100 °C against a 6 mm diameter, 13 mm long 52100 steel cylinder with three different contact areas corresponding to initial contact pressures of 157, 12 and 4 MPa. Sliding frequencies were varied between 1 and 15 Hz at a load of 50 N in order to establish the influence of both the contact pressure and velocity on the friction behaviour as a function of the lubrication regime. Textured features were observed to reduce the average coefficient of friction by up to 37% via a lubricant reservoir mechanism if the counter-surface contact width was greater than the feature dimension. Increases in contact pressure prevented a micro-EHL effect due to adhesive wear rather than pressurization of textured features.
0043-1648
1336-1344
Walker, John
b300eafd-5b0a-4cf5-86d2-735813b04c6f
Cinti, Stefano
d24fc475-fd02-4c21-bd5f-3979fa1bf0a9
Kamps, T.J.
1740baa3-4322-49a2-8b43-4081278ab3cf
Mitchell-Smith, Jonathon
b756ff9c-97f4-4ec4-a4cf-90aa1064dc38
Clare, A.T.
07b7d19d-56e4-4a3d-9be8-0a7446257fa4
Walker, John
b300eafd-5b0a-4cf5-86d2-735813b04c6f
Cinti, Stefano
d24fc475-fd02-4c21-bd5f-3979fa1bf0a9
Kamps, T.J.
1740baa3-4322-49a2-8b43-4081278ab3cf
Mitchell-Smith, Jonathon
b756ff9c-97f4-4ec4-a4cf-90aa1064dc38
Clare, A.T.
07b7d19d-56e4-4a3d-9be8-0a7446257fa4

Walker, John, Cinti, Stefano, Kamps, T.J., Mitchell-Smith, Jonathon and Clare, A.T. (2019) Influence of contact area on the sliding friction and wear behaviour of an electrochemical jet textured Al-Si alloy. Wear, 426-427 (Part B), 1336-1344. (doi:10.1016/j.wear.2019.01.008).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Environmental legislation continues to drive optimisation of internal combustion engines in the automotive sector in an effort to reduce harmful emissions and promote fuel efficiency. Significant frictional losses occur at the ring pack, prompting research on reducing sliding friction at the ring – liner interface through the use of surface texturing. This study assesses the influence of contact area on the friction and wear behaviour of light-weight monolithic hyper-eutectic Al-Si alloy with a textured surface generated by electrochemical jet texturing. Flat rectangular samples were prepared from a cast cylinder liner via electro-discharge machining and flat lapped to 6 µm diamond finish prior to immersion in a 1 mol solution of NaOH for 120 s to simulate the mechanical honing process. Surfaces were electrochemically jet textured using a 2.3 mol solution of NaCl and current density of 220 A/cm2. An offset array of 1.3 × 0.3 mm rectangular features at 1.2 mm spacing was created with an average depth of 39 µm. Lubricated reciprocating sliding was carried out at a stroke length of 25 mm in a bath of PAO (4 cSt) at 100 °C against a 6 mm diameter, 13 mm long 52100 steel cylinder with three different contact areas corresponding to initial contact pressures of 157, 12 and 4 MPa. Sliding frequencies were varied between 1 and 15 Hz at a load of 50 N in order to establish the influence of both the contact pressure and velocity on the friction behaviour as a function of the lubrication regime. Textured features were observed to reduce the average coefficient of friction by up to 37% via a lubricant reservoir mechanism if the counter-surface contact width was greater than the feature dimension. Increases in contact pressure prevented a micro-EHL effect due to adhesive wear rather than pressurization of textured features.

This record has no associated files available for download.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 3 January 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 10 April 2019
Published date: 30 April 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 434954
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/434954
ISSN: 0043-1648
PURE UUID: f2fedf7f-1e58-404e-821d-27791dfe1d3a

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 17 Oct 2019 16:30
Last modified: 25 Nov 2021 17:36

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: John Walker
Author: Stefano Cinti
Author: T.J. Kamps
Author: Jonathon Mitchell-Smith
Author: A.T. Clare

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×