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Enhanced flow-motion complexity of skin microvascular perfusion in Sherpas and lowlanders during ascent to high altitude

Enhanced flow-motion complexity of skin microvascular perfusion in Sherpas and lowlanders during ascent to high altitude
Enhanced flow-motion complexity of skin microvascular perfusion in Sherpas and lowlanders during ascent to high altitude
An increased and more effective microvascular perfusion is postulated to play a key role in the physiological adaptation of Sherpa highlanders to the hypobaric hypoxia encountered at high altitude. To investigate this, we used Lempel-Ziv complexity (LZC) analysis to explore the spatiotemporal dynamics of the variability of the skin microvascular blood flux (BF) signals measured at the forearm and finger, in 32 lowlanders (LL) and 46 Sherpa highlanders (SH) during the Xtreme Everest 2 expedition. Measurements were made at baseline (BL) (LL: London 35m; SH: Kathmandu 1300m) and at Everest base camp (LL and SH: EBC 5,300m). We found that BF signal content increased with ascent to EBC in both SH and LL. At both altitudes, LZC of the BF signals was significantly higher in SH, and was related to local slow-wave flow-motion activity over multiple spatial and temporal scales. In SH, BF LZC was also positively associated with LZC of the simultaneously measured tissue oxygenation signals. These data provide robust mechanistic information of microvascular network functionality and flexibility during hypoxic exposure on ascent to high altitude. They demonstrate the importance of a sustained heterogeneity of network perfusion, associated with local vaso-control mechanisms, to effective tissue oxygenation during hypobaric hypoxia.
biomedical engineering, Blood flow, complexity
2045-2322
1-12
Carey, Deborah
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Thanaj, Marjola
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Davies, Thomas
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Gilbert-Kawai, Edward
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Mitchell, Kay
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Levett, Denny
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Mythen, Michael G.
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Grocott, Michael
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Martin, Daniel S
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Chipperfield, Andrew
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Clough, Geraldine
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Carey, Deborah
20c4c753-f41f-4a62-aecc-53c2419a1ed1
Thanaj, Marjola
fb9baacc-4255-483d-8efa-e4fa983a9b2f
Davies, Thomas
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Gilbert-Kawai, Edward
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Mitchell, Kay
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Levett, Denny
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Mythen, Michael G.
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Grocott, Michael
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Martin, Daniel S
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Chipperfield, Andrew
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Clough, Geraldine
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Carey, Deborah, Thanaj, Marjola, Davies, Thomas, Gilbert-Kawai, Edward, Mitchell, Kay, Levett, Denny, Mythen, Michael G., Grocott, Michael, Martin, Daniel S, Chipperfield, Andrew and Clough, Geraldine (2019) Enhanced flow-motion complexity of skin microvascular perfusion in Sherpas and lowlanders during ascent to high altitude. Scientific Reports, 9, 1-12. (doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50774-0).

Record type: Article

Abstract

An increased and more effective microvascular perfusion is postulated to play a key role in the physiological adaptation of Sherpa highlanders to the hypobaric hypoxia encountered at high altitude. To investigate this, we used Lempel-Ziv complexity (LZC) analysis to explore the spatiotemporal dynamics of the variability of the skin microvascular blood flux (BF) signals measured at the forearm and finger, in 32 lowlanders (LL) and 46 Sherpa highlanders (SH) during the Xtreme Everest 2 expedition. Measurements were made at baseline (BL) (LL: London 35m; SH: Kathmandu 1300m) and at Everest base camp (LL and SH: EBC 5,300m). We found that BF signal content increased with ascent to EBC in both SH and LL. At both altitudes, LZC of the BF signals was significantly higher in SH, and was related to local slow-wave flow-motion activity over multiple spatial and temporal scales. In SH, BF LZC was also positively associated with LZC of the simultaneously measured tissue oxygenation signals. These data provide robust mechanistic information of microvascular network functionality and flexibility during hypoxic exposure on ascent to high altitude. They demonstrate the importance of a sustained heterogeneity of network perfusion, associated with local vaso-control mechanisms, to effective tissue oxygenation during hypobaric hypoxia.

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Carey-XE2_2019_SciRep_SREP_19_25153A_revision accepted version 160919 - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 13 September 2019
Published date: 7 October 2019
Keywords: biomedical engineering, Blood flow, complexity

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 434955
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/434955
ISSN: 2045-2322
PURE UUID: 7f867c63-3fb2-466f-8977-1ff4537cdb85
ORCID for Marjola Thanaj: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1789-7112
ORCID for Kay Mitchell: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6393-8475
ORCID for Michael Grocott: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9484-7581
ORCID for Andrew Chipperfield: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3026-9890
ORCID for Geraldine Clough: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6226-8964

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Date deposited: 17 Oct 2019 16:30
Last modified: 23 Oct 2019 00:38

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