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Analysis of optimal conditions for adsorptive hydrogen storage in microporous solids

Analysis of optimal conditions for adsorptive hydrogen storage in microporous solids
Analysis of optimal conditions for adsorptive hydrogen storage in microporous solids

There is much current interest in the storage of hydrogen in porous materials for mobile energy applications. Despite significant hydrogen storage capacities having been observed recently for some synthesised materials, the identification of optimal operating conditions (pressure and temperature) is perhaps an even more important consideration from an engineering and applied science perspective. There will be pressure and temperature limits for effective use of an adsorptive storage system, because the adsorbent will always displace a volume in the storage container, and so at very high pressures the amount of hydrogen stored at a given temperature will be greater for a container with no adsorbent. In order for an adsorbent to be used there has to be some gain in the amount of the hydrogen stored to compensate for the cost and mass of the solid. We present a methodology by which the pressure and temperature ranges where it is advantageous to use adsorptive storage can be easily identified and the real gain of using such systems in terms of the absolute amount of hydrogen stored can be quantified. Using a well-characterised commercial activated carbon as an example system, we modelled high pressure hydrogen sorption isotherms and identified the operating conditions for which there is a significant increase in storage capacity from using an adsorbent as opposed to storage in the same volume via compression of hydrogen at the same temperature. A novel comparison of the density enhancement in the micropores with respect to the bulk hydrogen gas, as well as the influence of incorporating different amounts of adsorbent into a high pressure storage container is also presented.

Adsorption, Compressed hydrogen systems, Hydrogen storage, Porous materials
0927-7757
113-119
Bimbo, Nuno
53d9fc24-e2c1-4e2d-8d75-8dc640d8adda
Ting, Valeska P.
d4381878-2aad-4a3f-a7cc-021a7f7075eb
Sharpe, Jessica E.
c8f4c69d-b116-49d1-ab40-71a5807b6a59
Mays, Timothy J.
d02351c7-1d8f-4a9e-8d16-675c1f7b3635
Bimbo, Nuno
53d9fc24-e2c1-4e2d-8d75-8dc640d8adda
Ting, Valeska P.
d4381878-2aad-4a3f-a7cc-021a7f7075eb
Sharpe, Jessica E.
c8f4c69d-b116-49d1-ab40-71a5807b6a59
Mays, Timothy J.
d02351c7-1d8f-4a9e-8d16-675c1f7b3635

Bimbo, Nuno, Ting, Valeska P., Sharpe, Jessica E. and Mays, Timothy J. (2013) Analysis of optimal conditions for adsorptive hydrogen storage in microporous solids. Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects, 437, 113-119. (doi:10.1016/j.colsurfa.2012.11.008).

Record type: Article

Abstract

There is much current interest in the storage of hydrogen in porous materials for mobile energy applications. Despite significant hydrogen storage capacities having been observed recently for some synthesised materials, the identification of optimal operating conditions (pressure and temperature) is perhaps an even more important consideration from an engineering and applied science perspective. There will be pressure and temperature limits for effective use of an adsorptive storage system, because the adsorbent will always displace a volume in the storage container, and so at very high pressures the amount of hydrogen stored at a given temperature will be greater for a container with no adsorbent. In order for an adsorbent to be used there has to be some gain in the amount of the hydrogen stored to compensate for the cost and mass of the solid. We present a methodology by which the pressure and temperature ranges where it is advantageous to use adsorptive storage can be easily identified and the real gain of using such systems in terms of the absolute amount of hydrogen stored can be quantified. Using a well-characterised commercial activated carbon as an example system, we modelled high pressure hydrogen sorption isotherms and identified the operating conditions for which there is a significant increase in storage capacity from using an adsorbent as opposed to storage in the same volume via compression of hydrogen at the same temperature. A novel comparison of the density enhancement in the micropores with respect to the bulk hydrogen gas, as well as the influence of incorporating different amounts of adsorbent into a high pressure storage container is also presented.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 5 November 2012
e-pub ahead of print date: 19 November 2012
Published date: 1 January 2013
Keywords: Adsorption, Compressed hydrogen systems, Hydrogen storage, Porous materials

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 435203
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/435203
ISSN: 0927-7757
PURE UUID: 556fbf0b-8a02-4510-b57f-fbb8e56d4f62

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Date deposited: 25 Oct 2019 16:30
Last modified: 25 Oct 2019 16:30

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Contributors

Author: Nuno Bimbo
Author: Valeska P. Ting
Author: Jessica E. Sharpe
Author: Timothy J. Mays

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