The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

High volumetric and energy densities of methane stored in nanoporous materials at ambient temperatures and moderate pressures

High volumetric and energy densities of methane stored in nanoporous materials at ambient temperatures and moderate pressures
High volumetric and energy densities of methane stored in nanoporous materials at ambient temperatures and moderate pressures

Experimental results for methane adsorption on two high-surface area carbons (TE7-20 and AX-21) and one metal-organic framework (MIL-101(Cr)) are presented, with isotherms obtained at temperatures ranging from 250 to 350K and at pressures up to 15MPa. The isotherms were analysed to determine if these materials could be viable alternatives for on-board solid-state storage of methane. The results show a very high adsorbate density in the pores of all materials, which for some can even exceed liquid methane density. At moderate pressures below 5MPa, the calculated total energy densities are close to the energy density of methanol, and are almost 40% of the energy density of gasoline (petrol). Compared with standard compression at the same conditions, the results show that adsorption can be a competitive storage alternative, as it can offer equal volumetric capacities at much lower pressures, hence reducing the energy penalty associated with compression. It is shown that the optimal conditions for adsorptive methane storage in these materials are at moderate pressure ranges, where the gains in amounts stored when using an adsorbent are more pronounced when compared to cylinders of compressed methane gas at the same operating conditions. Finally, a study on deliverable capacities for adsorbed methane was carried out, simulating two charging pressure scenarios of 3.5 and 6.5MPa and discharge at 0.5MPa. The results show that some of the tested materials have high working volumetric capacities, with some materials displaying more than 140kgm-3 volumetric working capacity for charging at 6.5MPa and delivery at 0.5MPa.

Methane adsorption, Methane storage, Porous materials
1385-8947
38-47
Bimbo, Nuno
53d9fc24-e2c1-4e2d-8d75-8dc640d8adda
Physick, Andrew J.
bbdea60b-bb76-480a-91d4-5f9d2f5f30ae
Noguera-Díaz, Antonio
bea37c4d-bae4-4946-98b4-9a3c367d94e4
Pugsley, Adam
b04c293b-87c8-4cf1-9c90-250baba85db5
Holyfield, Leighton T.
3749b08c-2586-4a45-86e8-a9c7e719e8d4
Ting, Valeska P.
d4381878-2aad-4a3f-a7cc-021a7f7075eb
Mays, Timothy J.
d02351c7-1d8f-4a9e-8d16-675c1f7b3635
Bimbo, Nuno
53d9fc24-e2c1-4e2d-8d75-8dc640d8adda
Physick, Andrew J.
bbdea60b-bb76-480a-91d4-5f9d2f5f30ae
Noguera-Díaz, Antonio
bea37c4d-bae4-4946-98b4-9a3c367d94e4
Pugsley, Adam
b04c293b-87c8-4cf1-9c90-250baba85db5
Holyfield, Leighton T.
3749b08c-2586-4a45-86e8-a9c7e719e8d4
Ting, Valeska P.
d4381878-2aad-4a3f-a7cc-021a7f7075eb
Mays, Timothy J.
d02351c7-1d8f-4a9e-8d16-675c1f7b3635

Bimbo, Nuno, Physick, Andrew J., Noguera-Díaz, Antonio, Pugsley, Adam, Holyfield, Leighton T., Ting, Valeska P. and Mays, Timothy J. (2015) High volumetric and energy densities of methane stored in nanoporous materials at ambient temperatures and moderate pressures. Chemical Engineering Journal, 272, 38-47. (doi:10.1016/j.cej.2015.02.088).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Experimental results for methane adsorption on two high-surface area carbons (TE7-20 and AX-21) and one metal-organic framework (MIL-101(Cr)) are presented, with isotherms obtained at temperatures ranging from 250 to 350K and at pressures up to 15MPa. The isotherms were analysed to determine if these materials could be viable alternatives for on-board solid-state storage of methane. The results show a very high adsorbate density in the pores of all materials, which for some can even exceed liquid methane density. At moderate pressures below 5MPa, the calculated total energy densities are close to the energy density of methanol, and are almost 40% of the energy density of gasoline (petrol). Compared with standard compression at the same conditions, the results show that adsorption can be a competitive storage alternative, as it can offer equal volumetric capacities at much lower pressures, hence reducing the energy penalty associated with compression. It is shown that the optimal conditions for adsorptive methane storage in these materials are at moderate pressure ranges, where the gains in amounts stored when using an adsorbent are more pronounced when compared to cylinders of compressed methane gas at the same operating conditions. Finally, a study on deliverable capacities for adsorbed methane was carried out, simulating two charging pressure scenarios of 3.5 and 6.5MPa and discharge at 0.5MPa. The results show that some of the tested materials have high working volumetric capacities, with some materials displaying more than 140kgm-3 volumetric working capacity for charging at 6.5MPa and delivery at 0.5MPa.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 25 February 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 11 March 2015
Published date: 5 July 2015
Keywords: Methane adsorption, Methane storage, Porous materials

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 435205
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/435205
ISSN: 1385-8947
PURE UUID: cf991dac-b979-4206-9320-51c87d0aed23

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 25 Oct 2019 16:30
Last modified: 25 Oct 2019 16:30

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Nuno Bimbo
Author: Andrew J. Physick
Author: Antonio Noguera-Díaz
Author: Adam Pugsley
Author: Leighton T. Holyfield
Author: Valeska P. Ting
Author: Timothy J. Mays

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×