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A novel exploration of the support needs of people initiating insulin pump therapy using a social-network approach: a longitudinal mixed-methods study

A novel exploration of the support needs of people initiating insulin pump therapy using a social-network approach: a longitudinal mixed-methods study
A novel exploration of the support needs of people initiating insulin pump therapy using a social-network approach: a longitudinal mixed-methods study
Aims:
Few diabetes interventions approach improving health and well-being through social networks, yet social networks provide a potentially powerful means of mobilising, mediating and accessing support and resources. We aimed to establish what practical and emotional means of support are required upon initiation of insulin pump therapy and how needs change over time using GENIE, a social network intervention.

Methods:
The longitudinal design used semi-structured interviews, surveys (PAID, CLARKE) and HbA1c from pump initiation, three and six months on. Interviews used GENIE to capture participants’ expectations and experiences of pump therapy and associated support and resources. Thematic analysis was used with sequential, time-ordered matrices.

Results:
Sixteen adults undertook 47 interviews. A total of 94 activities were acquired while tally, frequency and value of network members increased over time. The novelty of pump therapy impacted on participants self-management needs. Key themes included: 1. The independent nature of managing diabetes, 2. Overcoming the challenges and illness-burden of a pump, 3. The need for responsive and tailored emotional and practical support, and 4. Useful resources when incorporating pump therapy. GENIE was thought to be novel and beneficial.

Conclusions:
A social network approach determined what resources and support people with diabetes require when incorporating a new health technology. Visualisation of support networks using concentric circles enabled people to consider and mobilise support and engage in new activities as their needs changed. The novelty of pump therapy creates new illness work but mobilisation of personally valued flexible, tailored support can improve the process of adaptation.
Insulin pumps, Self-management, Social network intervention, Diabetes, Social support
0742-3071
Reidy, Claire
d500bfe7-7429-4484-b092-60ef0757d0de
Foster, Claire
00786ac1-bd47-4aeb-a0e2-40e058695b73
Rogers, Anne
105eeebc-1899-4850-950e-385a51738eb7
Reidy, Claire
d500bfe7-7429-4484-b092-60ef0757d0de
Foster, Claire
00786ac1-bd47-4aeb-a0e2-40e058695b73
Rogers, Anne
105eeebc-1899-4850-950e-385a51738eb7

Reidy, Claire, Foster, Claire and Rogers, Anne (2019) A novel exploration of the support needs of people initiating insulin pump therapy using a social-network approach: a longitudinal mixed-methods study. Diabetic Medicine, [DME-2019-00314]. (doi:10.1111/dme.14155).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Aims:
Few diabetes interventions approach improving health and well-being through social networks, yet social networks provide a potentially powerful means of mobilising, mediating and accessing support and resources. We aimed to establish what practical and emotional means of support are required upon initiation of insulin pump therapy and how needs change over time using GENIE, a social network intervention.

Methods:
The longitudinal design used semi-structured interviews, surveys (PAID, CLARKE) and HbA1c from pump initiation, three and six months on. Interviews used GENIE to capture participants’ expectations and experiences of pump therapy and associated support and resources. Thematic analysis was used with sequential, time-ordered matrices.

Results:
Sixteen adults undertook 47 interviews. A total of 94 activities were acquired while tally, frequency and value of network members increased over time. The novelty of pump therapy impacted on participants self-management needs. Key themes included: 1. The independent nature of managing diabetes, 2. Overcoming the challenges and illness-burden of a pump, 3. The need for responsive and tailored emotional and practical support, and 4. Useful resources when incorporating pump therapy. GENIE was thought to be novel and beneficial.

Conclusions:
A social network approach determined what resources and support people with diabetes require when incorporating a new health technology. Visualisation of support networks using concentric circles enabled people to consider and mobilise support and engage in new activities as their needs changed. The novelty of pump therapy creates new illness work but mobilisation of personally valued flexible, tailored support can improve the process of adaptation.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 30 August 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 16 October 2019
Keywords: Insulin pumps, Self-management, Social network intervention, Diabetes, Social support

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 435250
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/435250
ISSN: 0742-3071
PURE UUID: 5268eb24-27ff-43bb-ba20-0c9ab2e5126e
ORCID for Claire Reidy: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0013-6843
ORCID for Claire Foster: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4703-8378

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 28 Oct 2019 17:31
Last modified: 16 Oct 2020 04:01

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