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Interceptor drains for cliff tops and above the crests of slopes and cuttings

Interceptor drains for cliff tops and above the crests of slopes and cuttings
Interceptor drains for cliff tops and above the crests of slopes and cuttings
Three types of interceptor drain considered in the paper are (i) drains for surface water (ii) cut-off drains in pervious strata overlying a relatively impervious stratum and (iii) vertical drainage wells for draining water into either pervious strata at depth or drains bored (or tunnelled) in from the slope face. Their function is to prevent surface or ground water from reaching an actual or potential landslide: drainage of the landslide itself is not considered in this paper.

Various difficulties which may impair the effectiveness of interceptor drains are listed. Cases from the literature are reviewed and new observations made on interceptor drains of which the authors have direct experience. It is shown that the performance of these drains may often be less than satisfactory and it is concluded that by their nature interceptor drains require rigourous site investigation and monitoring before, during and after construction. Attention is also drawn to the generally negligible influence of interceptor drains on rates of equilibration of pore-water pressures depressed by unloading in clay soils.
487-496
Geological Society
Barton, Max
eea85a67-8def-49a1-a48c-f332310388d9
Thomson, R.I.
0a8ef4e9-3fca-495d-8105-7a846e8118d7
Cripps, J.C.
Bell, F.G.
Culshaw, M.G.
r I thomson
Barton, Max
eea85a67-8def-49a1-a48c-f332310388d9
Thomson, R.I.
0a8ef4e9-3fca-495d-8105-7a846e8118d7
Cripps, J.C.
Bell, F.G.
Culshaw, M.G.

Barton, Max and Thomson, R.I. (1986) Interceptor drains for cliff tops and above the crests of slopes and cuttings. Cripps, J.C., Bell, F.G. and Culshaw, M.G. (eds.) In Groundwater in Engineering Geology: Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference of the Engineering Group of the Geological Society held at The University of Sheffield 15th–19th September 1985. vol. 3, Geological Society. pp. 487-496 .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Three types of interceptor drain considered in the paper are (i) drains for surface water (ii) cut-off drains in pervious strata overlying a relatively impervious stratum and (iii) vertical drainage wells for draining water into either pervious strata at depth or drains bored (or tunnelled) in from the slope face. Their function is to prevent surface or ground water from reaching an actual or potential landslide: drainage of the landslide itself is not considered in this paper.

Various difficulties which may impair the effectiveness of interceptor drains are listed. Cases from the literature are reviewed and new observations made on interceptor drains of which the authors have direct experience. It is shown that the performance of these drains may often be less than satisfactory and it is concluded that by their nature interceptor drains require rigourous site investigation and monitoring before, during and after construction. Attention is also drawn to the generally negligible influence of interceptor drains on rates of equilibration of pore-water pressures depressed by unloading in clay soils.

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Published date: 1986

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Local EPrints ID: 435255
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/435255
PURE UUID: d8ea4b29-aefb-4a45-ac59-134652f5b435

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Date deposited: 29 Oct 2019 17:30
Last modified: 29 Oct 2019 17:30

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