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A model for predicting groundwater level response to meteorological changes

A model for predicting groundwater level response to meteorological changes
A model for predicting groundwater level response to meteorological changes
The most characteristic feature of the Barton Clay cliffs of Christchurch Bay is the presence of a number of preferred bedding plane surfaces of shearing. Most of these are contained within clay horizons and the reason for their preferential use by the coastal landslides is unknown. One surface, however, is at the base of the 2.7 m thick A3 Zone which consists of inter-bedded sand and clays. This surface is well exposed and forms a distinct feature in the cliffs throughout nearly the whole of the 1.5 mile coastal outcrop of the A3 Zone.

The paper discusses the reason why a shear surface is preferentially developed at this stratigraphic location. Three possible causes are discussed under the headings of (i) pore pressure fluctuation, (ii) seepage erosion and piping and (iii) equilibration response time. The first two are well established theories but the third is a new hypothesis derived from the original Bishop and Bjerrum theory of delayed equilibration. It is considered that the discussion is useful in the general context of landsliding at sand/clay junctions in overconsolidated soils.
229-311
Geological Society
Barton, Max
eea85a67-8def-49a1-a48c-f332310388d9
Thomson, R.I.
0a8ef4e9-3fca-495d-8105-7a846e8118d7
Cripps, J.C.
Bell, F.G.
Culshaw, M.G.
Barton, Max
eea85a67-8def-49a1-a48c-f332310388d9
Thomson, R.I.
0a8ef4e9-3fca-495d-8105-7a846e8118d7
Cripps, J.C.
Bell, F.G.
Culshaw, M.G.

Barton, Max and Thomson, R.I. (1986) A model for predicting groundwater level response to meteorological changes. Cripps, J.C., Bell, F.G. and Culshaw, M.G. (eds.) In Groundwater in Engineering Geology: Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference of the Engineering Group of the Geological Society held at The University of Sheffield 15th–19th September 1985. vol. 3, Geological Society. pp. 229-311 .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

The most characteristic feature of the Barton Clay cliffs of Christchurch Bay is the presence of a number of preferred bedding plane surfaces of shearing. Most of these are contained within clay horizons and the reason for their preferential use by the coastal landslides is unknown. One surface, however, is at the base of the 2.7 m thick A3 Zone which consists of inter-bedded sand and clays. This surface is well exposed and forms a distinct feature in the cliffs throughout nearly the whole of the 1.5 mile coastal outcrop of the A3 Zone.

The paper discusses the reason why a shear surface is preferentially developed at this stratigraphic location. Three possible causes are discussed under the headings of (i) pore pressure fluctuation, (ii) seepage erosion and piping and (iii) equilibration response time. The first two are well established theories but the third is a new hypothesis derived from the original Bishop and Bjerrum theory of delayed equilibration. It is considered that the discussion is useful in the general context of landsliding at sand/clay junctions in overconsolidated soils.

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Published date: 1986

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 435256
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/435256
PURE UUID: 67d31ae4-60ed-412e-adec-df7280683d08

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Date deposited: 29 Oct 2019 17:30
Last modified: 29 Oct 2019 17:30

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