The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

The choice between a panel and cohort study design

The choice between a panel and cohort study design
The choice between a panel and cohort study design
Executive Summary

The UK has a long and rich history of longitudinal studies, including cohort studies and longitudinal panels, and we summarise the main studies and their key features. We go on to identify the key differences between cohort and panel approaches, in the population coverage and whether refreshment samples are expected; what types of questions can be used; the sample design and sample size; and the choice of spacing of waves. Over a long period panels and cohorts collect similar amounts of information, but in a single cohort there is no way to measure the cohort effect separately from time effects. Early in the studies, the differences are greater. Cohort studies can have questionnaires much more tailored to the age and expected life course events of the respondents than a panel study, which must cater for many ages.

Accelerated cohort designs offer an intermediate solution, where the collection can be tailored, but where cohort effects can be estimated, as long as there is some overlap between the ages in the cohorts. There are several additional factors to consider in an accelerated cohort design.

Making choices about which features are important in a new cohort study depends on the answers to many questions about what the intended analytical outcomes are, and how long the study will run.
University of Southampton
Lugtig, Peter
e749613a-44d3-4530-8c27-5aed659da8eb
Smith, Paul A.
a2548525-4f99-4baf-a4d0-2b216cce059c
Lugtig, Peter
e749613a-44d3-4530-8c27-5aed659da8eb
Smith, Paul A.
a2548525-4f99-4baf-a4d0-2b216cce059c

Lugtig, Peter and Smith, Paul A. (2019) The choice between a panel and cohort study design University of Southampton 16pp.

Record type: Monograph (Project Report)

Abstract

Executive Summary

The UK has a long and rich history of longitudinal studies, including cohort studies and longitudinal panels, and we summarise the main studies and their key features. We go on to identify the key differences between cohort and panel approaches, in the population coverage and whether refreshment samples are expected; what types of questions can be used; the sample design and sample size; and the choice of spacing of waves. Over a long period panels and cohorts collect similar amounts of information, but in a single cohort there is no way to measure the cohort effect separately from time effects. Early in the studies, the differences are greater. Cohort studies can have questionnaires much more tailored to the age and expected life course events of the respondents than a panel study, which must cater for many ages.

Accelerated cohort designs offer an intermediate solution, where the collection can be tailored, but where cohort effects can be estimated, as long as there is some overlap between the ages in the cohorts. There are several additional factors to consider in an accelerated cohort design.

Making choices about which features are important in a new cohort study depends on the answers to many questions about what the intended analytical outcomes are, and how long the study will run.

Text
WP4 The choice between a panel and cohort study design
Download (282kB)

More information

Published date: July 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 435301
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/435301
PURE UUID: f8ee9024-b3c9-4e34-88f7-0d7fd2852d2d
ORCID for Paul A. Smith: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5337-2746

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 30 Oct 2019 17:30
Last modified: 14 Aug 2020 01:41

Export record

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×