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Administrative vs survey data for longitudinal analyses

Administrative vs survey data for longitudinal analyses
Administrative vs survey data for longitudinal analyses
Executive summary

Social longitudinal analyses in the UK have largely been based on survey data, assisted by the investment on cohort and panel studies. In recent years there has been a move to utilise alternative data sources and particularly administrative data. The differences in properties in and benefits and drawbacks of the different types of data are summarised.

Administrative data sources are becoming more widely used in a range of contexts, but it is more challenging to discover the detailed changes and metadata. It is recommended that the possibility of commissioning ‘administrative data biographies’ should be explored, which will describe the evolution of the administrative sources and the way the information in them is gathered.

Linked administrative data and combined administrative and survey data present a wider range of analytical possibilities, but there are challenges in consent for linkage and in undertaking the linkage itself.

A spine is a list of people derived from one or more administrative sources, and to which other data can be linked. We describe some of the considerations in constructing and using a spine in support of longitudinal survey taking.
University of Southampton
Smith, Paul A.
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Berrington, Ann
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Smith, Peter W.F.
961a01a3-bf4c-43ca-9599-5be4fd5d3940
Smith, Paul A.
a2548525-4f99-4baf-a4d0-2b216cce059c
Berrington, Ann
bd0fc093-310d-4236-8126-ca0c7eb9ddde
Smith, Peter W.F.
961a01a3-bf4c-43ca-9599-5be4fd5d3940

Smith, Paul A., Berrington, Ann and Smith, Peter W.F. (2019) Administrative vs survey data for longitudinal analyses University of Southampton 13pp.

Record type: Monograph (Project Report)

Abstract

Executive summary

Social longitudinal analyses in the UK have largely been based on survey data, assisted by the investment on cohort and panel studies. In recent years there has been a move to utilise alternative data sources and particularly administrative data. The differences in properties in and benefits and drawbacks of the different types of data are summarised.

Administrative data sources are becoming more widely used in a range of contexts, but it is more challenging to discover the detailed changes and metadata. It is recommended that the possibility of commissioning ‘administrative data biographies’ should be explored, which will describe the evolution of the administrative sources and the way the information in them is gathered.

Linked administrative data and combined administrative and survey data present a wider range of analytical possibilities, but there are challenges in consent for linkage and in undertaking the linkage itself.

A spine is a list of people derived from one or more administrative sources, and to which other data can be linked. We describe some of the considerations in constructing and using a spine in support of longitudinal survey taking.

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WP1 Administrative vs survey data for longitudinal analyses
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Published date: July 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 435303
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/435303
PURE UUID: a30be481-4c2b-4c93-8119-6bbee80342e6
ORCID for Paul A. Smith: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5337-2746
ORCID for Ann Berrington: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1683-6668
ORCID for Peter W.F. Smith: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4423-5410

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 30 Oct 2019 17:30
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:43

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