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The Quality of Interactions Schedule (QuIS) and person-centred care in acute hospitals: concurrent validity

The Quality of Interactions Schedule (QuIS) and person-centred care in acute hospitals: concurrent validity
The Quality of Interactions Schedule (QuIS) and person-centred care in acute hospitals: concurrent validity
Background
There is a lack of consensus on how the practices of health care workers may be assessed and measured in relation to compassion. The Quality of Interactions Schedule (QuIS) is a promising measure that uses independent observers to assess the quality of social interactions between staff and patients in a healthcare context. Further understanding of the relationship between QuIS and constructs such as person-centred care would be helpful to guide its future use in health research.

Objective
This study aimed to assess the validity of QuIS in relation to person-centred care measured using the CARES® Observational Tool (COT™).

Methods
168 nursing staff-patient care interactions on adult inpatient units in two acute care UK National Health Service hospitals were observed and rated using QuIS and COT™. Analyses explored the relationship between summary and individual item COT™ scores and the likelihood of a negative (lower quality) QuIS rating.

Results
As the degree of person-centred care improved, QuIS negative ratings generally decreased and positive social ratings increased. QuIS-rated negative interactions were associated with an absence of some behaviours, in particular staff approaching patients from the front (relative risk (RR) 3.7), introducing themselves (RR 3.1), smiling and making eye contact (RR 3.4), and involving patients in their care (RR 3.7).

Conclusion
These findings provide further information about the validity of QuIS measurements in healthcare contexts, and the extent to which it can be used to reflect the quality of relational care even for people who are unable to self-report.
0020-7489
1-8
Bridges, Jackie
57e80ebe-ee5f-4219-9bbc-43215e8363cd
Gould, Lisa J
363cc1b3-078d-48eb-a164-feee7dcd9246
Hope, Joanna
5d49099e-13bc-49d2-88d8-48e1ec6d25fc
Schoonhoven, Lisette
46a2705b-c657-409b-b9da-329d5b1b02de
Griffiths, Peter
ac7afec1-7d72-4b83-b016-3a43e245265b
Bridges, Jackie
57e80ebe-ee5f-4219-9bbc-43215e8363cd
Gould, Lisa J
363cc1b3-078d-48eb-a164-feee7dcd9246
Hope, Joanna
5d49099e-13bc-49d2-88d8-48e1ec6d25fc
Schoonhoven, Lisette
46a2705b-c657-409b-b9da-329d5b1b02de
Griffiths, Peter
ac7afec1-7d72-4b83-b016-3a43e245265b

Bridges, Jackie, Gould, Lisa J, Hope, Joanna, Schoonhoven, Lisette and Griffiths, Peter (2019) The Quality of Interactions Schedule (QuIS) and person-centred care in acute hospitals: concurrent validity. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 1, 1-8. (doi:10.1016/j.ijnsa.2019.100001).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background
There is a lack of consensus on how the practices of health care workers may be assessed and measured in relation to compassion. The Quality of Interactions Schedule (QuIS) is a promising measure that uses independent observers to assess the quality of social interactions between staff and patients in a healthcare context. Further understanding of the relationship between QuIS and constructs such as person-centred care would be helpful to guide its future use in health research.

Objective
This study aimed to assess the validity of QuIS in relation to person-centred care measured using the CARES® Observational Tool (COT™).

Methods
168 nursing staff-patient care interactions on adult inpatient units in two acute care UK National Health Service hospitals were observed and rated using QuIS and COT™. Analyses explored the relationship between summary and individual item COT™ scores and the likelihood of a negative (lower quality) QuIS rating.

Results
As the degree of person-centred care improved, QuIS negative ratings generally decreased and positive social ratings increased. QuIS-rated negative interactions were associated with an absence of some behaviours, in particular staff approaching patients from the front (relative risk (RR) 3.7), introducing themselves (RR 3.1), smiling and making eye contact (RR 3.4), and involving patients in their care (RR 3.7).

Conclusion
These findings provide further information about the validity of QuIS measurements in healthcare contexts, and the extent to which it can be used to reflect the quality of relational care even for people who are unable to self-report.

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The Quality of Interactions Schedule (QuIS) and person-centred care in acute hospitals concurrent validity - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 27 October 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 18 November 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 435445
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/435445
ISSN: 0020-7489
PURE UUID: 1f6adcc4-e9d6-46be-80a6-2c2be91997b2
ORCID for Jackie Bridges: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6776-736X
ORCID for Joanna Hope: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8939-7045
ORCID for Lisette Schoonhoven: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7129-3766
ORCID for Peter Griffiths: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2439-2857

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 Nov 2019 17:30
Last modified: 22 Nov 2021 07:47

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