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A journey in (Interpolated) sound: impact of different visualizations in graphical interpolators

A journey in (Interpolated) sound: impact of different visualizations in graphical interpolators
A journey in (Interpolated) sound: impact of different visualizations in graphical interpolators
Graphical interpolation systems provide a simple mechanism for the control of sound synthesis systems by providing a level of abstraction above the parameters of the synthesis engine, allowing users to explore different sounds without awareness of the synthesis details. While a number of graphical interpolator systems have been developed over many years, with a variety of user-interface designs, few have been subject to user-evaluations. We present the testing and evaluation of alternative visualizations for a graphical interpolator in order to establish if the visual feedback provided through the interface aids the identification of sounds with the system. Typically, interpolator systems present the user with a two-dimensional graphical pane where synthesizer presets can be located. Moving an interpolation point cursor within the pane will then calculate new parameter values, based on the interpolation model, cursor position and the relative locations of the presets, generating new sounds. These systems therefore supply users with two sensory modalities in the form of sonic output and visual feedback from the interface. Our testing aimed to study how users interact with interpolation systems and make journeys through the interpolated sounds defined by the space, in order to better understand the design considerations for graphical interpolators. Furthermore, the testing examined if, when different levels of visual feedback are provided to the user, this aids the discovery of new sounds. The testing took the form of comparing the users’ mouse traces, showing the journey they made through the interpolated sounds when different visual interfaces were used. In addition, Null Hypothesis Significance Testing (NHST) was undertaken to examine if there is a significant difference in the way users interact with different interfaces. Sixteen participants took part in the user testing and a summary of the results is presented, showing that the visuals provide users with additional cues that lead to better interaction with the interpolators.
The Association of Computing Machinery, Inc.
Gibson, Darrell, James
cb2f26ee-ea1e-47c8-860a-9c8a6bdc4d7f
Polfreman, Richard
26424c3d-b750-4868-bf6e-2bbb3990df84
Gibson, Darrell, James
cb2f26ee-ea1e-47c8-860a-9c8a6bdc4d7f
Polfreman, Richard
26424c3d-b750-4868-bf6e-2bbb3990df84

Gibson, Darrell, James and Polfreman, Richard (2019) A journey in (Interpolated) sound: impact of different visualizations in graphical interpolators. In Proceedings of the 14th International Audio Mostly Conference. The Association of Computing Machinery, Inc. 4 pp . (In Press)

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Graphical interpolation systems provide a simple mechanism for the control of sound synthesis systems by providing a level of abstraction above the parameters of the synthesis engine, allowing users to explore different sounds without awareness of the synthesis details. While a number of graphical interpolator systems have been developed over many years, with a variety of user-interface designs, few have been subject to user-evaluations. We present the testing and evaluation of alternative visualizations for a graphical interpolator in order to establish if the visual feedback provided through the interface aids the identification of sounds with the system. Typically, interpolator systems present the user with a two-dimensional graphical pane where synthesizer presets can be located. Moving an interpolation point cursor within the pane will then calculate new parameter values, based on the interpolation model, cursor position and the relative locations of the presets, generating new sounds. These systems therefore supply users with two sensory modalities in the form of sonic output and visual feedback from the interface. Our testing aimed to study how users interact with interpolation systems and make journeys through the interpolated sounds defined by the space, in order to better understand the design considerations for graphical interpolators. Furthermore, the testing examined if, when different levels of visual feedback are provided to the user, this aids the discovery of new sounds. The testing took the form of comparing the users’ mouse traces, showing the journey they made through the interpolated sounds when different visual interfaces were used. In addition, Null Hypothesis Significance Testing (NHST) was undertaken to examine if there is a significant difference in the way users interact with different interfaces. Sixteen participants took part in the user testing and a summary of the results is presented, showing that the visuals provide users with additional cues that lead to better interaction with the interpolators.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 3 August 2019
Venue - Dates: Audio Mostly 2019: A Journey in Sound, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom, 2019-09-18 - 2019-09-20

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 435460
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/435460
PURE UUID: 35616d5e-792d-4a95-8b04-708653f74f8b

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 07 Nov 2019 17:30
Last modified: 09 Nov 2021 16:25

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Contributors

Author: Darrell, James Gibson

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