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Notetaking in the lecture theatre - examining the impacts of popular encoding strategies

Notetaking in the lecture theatre - examining the impacts of popular encoding strategies
Notetaking in the lecture theatre - examining the impacts of popular encoding strategies
Lecture slide handout annotation has largely replaced the once prevalent practice of longhand notetaking. What impact has this had on student learning? In Experiment 1, students viewed two lectures, one presented fluently and the other disfluently, whilst either observing without making any form of notes, annotating handouts, taking notes for themselves or taking notes for a friend before immediate and delayed testing. Students in both notetaking groups out-performed observers and annotators, but there was no difference in performance between the latter groups. This learning benefit from notetaking was not reflected in confidence, suggesting that students are metacognitively unaware of it. In Experiment 2, students viewed two lectures, each consisting of material pertaining to both concepts and facts. One lecture was presented at a regular pace and the other at a faster pace. As with Experiment 1, students who made longhand notes performed better across all of the above conditions than observers and annotators, who did not differ from each other in terms of test scores. These findings suggest that notetaking is more beneficial for memory than lecture slide handout annotation across a wide range of lecture scenarios over both short and long-­term periods.
University of Southampton
Coria, Katie Alice
9a371b23-5252-4ac1-8f6d-430a0690d56c
Coria, Katie Alice
9a371b23-5252-4ac1-8f6d-430a0690d56c
Higham, Philip
4093b28f-7d58-4d18-89d4-021792e418e7

Coria, Katie Alice (2018) Notetaking in the lecture theatre - examining the impacts of popular encoding strategies. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 297pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Lecture slide handout annotation has largely replaced the once prevalent practice of longhand notetaking. What impact has this had on student learning? In Experiment 1, students viewed two lectures, one presented fluently and the other disfluently, whilst either observing without making any form of notes, annotating handouts, taking notes for themselves or taking notes for a friend before immediate and delayed testing. Students in both notetaking groups out-performed observers and annotators, but there was no difference in performance between the latter groups. This learning benefit from notetaking was not reflected in confidence, suggesting that students are metacognitively unaware of it. In Experiment 2, students viewed two lectures, each consisting of material pertaining to both concepts and facts. One lecture was presented at a regular pace and the other at a faster pace. As with Experiment 1, students who made longhand notes performed better across all of the above conditions than observers and annotators, who did not differ from each other in terms of test scores. These findings suggest that notetaking is more beneficial for memory than lecture slide handout annotation across a wide range of lecture scenarios over both short and long-­term periods.

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Notetaking in the Lecture Threatre - Examining the Impacts of Popular Encoding Strategies - Version of Record
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Published date: December 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 435771
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/435771
PURE UUID: c8229279-f95d-48e4-9517-3ba0b476c79e

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 20 Nov 2019 17:30
Last modified: 20 Nov 2019 17:30

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Contributors

Author: Katie Alice Coria
Thesis advisor: Philip Higham

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