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Human appetitive Pavlovian-to-instrumental transfer: a goal-directed account

Human appetitive Pavlovian-to-instrumental transfer: a goal-directed account
Human appetitive Pavlovian-to-instrumental transfer: a goal-directed account
Pavlovian-to-instrumental transfer (PIT) tasks assess the impact of environmental stimuli on instrumental actions. Since their initial translation from animal to human experiments, PIT tasks have provided insight in to the mechanisms that underlie reward-based behaviour. This review first examines the main types of PIT tasks used in humans. We then seek to contribute to the current debate as to whether human PIT effects reflect a controlled, goal-directed process, or a more automatic, non-goal-directed mechanism. We argue that the data favour a goal-directed process. The extent to which the major theories of PIT can account for these data is then explored. We discuss a number of associative accounts of PIT, as well as dual-process versions of these theories. Ultimately, however, we favour a propositional account, in which human PIT effects are suggested to be driven by both perceived outcome availability and outcome value. In the final section of the review, we present the potential objections to the propositional approach that we anticipate from advocates of associative-link theories, and our response to them. We also identify areas for future research.
0340-0727
449-463
Mahlberg, Justin
9b7460d7-91a6-4534-9e84-a0a077592d59
Seabrooke, Tina
bf0d9ea5-8cf7-494b-9707-891762fce6c3
Weidemann, Gabrielle
537e7688-14dc-4bfa-9a41-d9d438dcda0f
Hogarth, Lee
513c8068-4190-48dc-9e30-add8acc872a9
Mitchell, Chris
f61a70e4-6c49-46a2-8cef-2ee4c5172423
Moustafa, Ahmed
70340b43-2551-42e3-a27e-7b8c1867653a
Mahlberg, Justin
9b7460d7-91a6-4534-9e84-a0a077592d59
Seabrooke, Tina
bf0d9ea5-8cf7-494b-9707-891762fce6c3
Weidemann, Gabrielle
537e7688-14dc-4bfa-9a41-d9d438dcda0f
Hogarth, Lee
513c8068-4190-48dc-9e30-add8acc872a9
Mitchell, Chris
f61a70e4-6c49-46a2-8cef-2ee4c5172423
Moustafa, Ahmed
70340b43-2551-42e3-a27e-7b8c1867653a

Mahlberg, Justin, Seabrooke, Tina, Weidemann, Gabrielle, Hogarth, Lee, Mitchell, Chris and Moustafa, Ahmed (2021) Human appetitive Pavlovian-to-instrumental transfer: a goal-directed account. Psychological Research, 85 (2), 449-463. (doi:10.1007/s00426-019-01266-3).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Pavlovian-to-instrumental transfer (PIT) tasks assess the impact of environmental stimuli on instrumental actions. Since their initial translation from animal to human experiments, PIT tasks have provided insight in to the mechanisms that underlie reward-based behaviour. This review first examines the main types of PIT tasks used in humans. We then seek to contribute to the current debate as to whether human PIT effects reflect a controlled, goal-directed process, or a more automatic, non-goal-directed mechanism. We argue that the data favour a goal-directed process. The extent to which the major theories of PIT can account for these data is then explored. We discuss a number of associative accounts of PIT, as well as dual-process versions of these theories. Ultimately, however, we favour a propositional account, in which human PIT effects are suggested to be driven by both perceived outcome availability and outcome value. In the final section of the review, we present the potential objections to the propositional approach that we anticipate from advocates of associative-link theories, and our response to them. We also identify areas for future research.

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jmahlberg_manuscript_humanPITreview-round3minorrevisions v6 - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 4 November 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 13 November 2019
Published date: 2021

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 435794
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/435794
ISSN: 0340-0727
PURE UUID: f6781c2c-b36c-4ee6-984c-62155077999e
ORCID for Tina Seabrooke: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4119-8389

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 20 Nov 2019 17:30
Last modified: 22 Nov 2021 07:49

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Contributors

Author: Justin Mahlberg
Author: Tina Seabrooke ORCID iD
Author: Gabrielle Weidemann
Author: Lee Hogarth
Author: Chris Mitchell
Author: Ahmed Moustafa

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