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Is speeding more likely during weekend night hours? Evidence from sensor-collected data in Montreal

Is speeding more likely during weekend night hours? Evidence from sensor-collected data in Montreal
Is speeding more likely during weekend night hours? Evidence from sensor-collected data in Montreal
A number of traffic safety studies have investigated temporal variations in road safety indicators such as crash frequency, confirming that such variations exist. This paper examined whether speeding is more likely on weekend nights relative to all other times of the day by directly comparing speeding during weekends and weekdays. To this end, we analysed a sample of local streets, in Montreal, for which speed data were collected automatically using traffic analyser sensors. We found that, interestingly, weekend speeding was less likely to occur during night hours, whereas it was more likely to occur during evening and midday hours. Among other findings, the results indicated that one-way streets and those having a speed limit of 50 km/h were slightly less prevalent in speeding on weekends. Our results can be useful in designing road safety interventions, including publicity campaigns and police enforcement, which aim at reducing speeding behaviours.
speeding behaviour, weekends, weekdays, speed limits, temporal variation
0315-1468
Heydari, Shahram
0d12a583-a4e8-4888-9e51-a50d312be1e9
Miranda-Moreno, Luis F.
b61c4a8f-b48e-4c04-b051-3184945da9e4
Fu, Liping
239058dc-3019-46af-9488-0bde99e6904a
Heydari, Shahram
0d12a583-a4e8-4888-9e51-a50d312be1e9
Miranda-Moreno, Luis F.
b61c4a8f-b48e-4c04-b051-3184945da9e4
Fu, Liping
239058dc-3019-46af-9488-0bde99e6904a

Heydari, Shahram, Miranda-Moreno, Luis F. and Fu, Liping (2019) Is speeding more likely during weekend night hours? Evidence from sensor-collected data in Montreal. Canadian Journal of Civil Engineering. (doi:10.1139/cjce-2019-0321).

Record type: Article

Abstract

A number of traffic safety studies have investigated temporal variations in road safety indicators such as crash frequency, confirming that such variations exist. This paper examined whether speeding is more likely on weekend nights relative to all other times of the day by directly comparing speeding during weekends and weekdays. To this end, we analysed a sample of local streets, in Montreal, for which speed data were collected automatically using traffic analyser sensors. We found that, interestingly, weekend speeding was less likely to occur during night hours, whereas it was more likely to occur during evening and midday hours. Among other findings, the results indicated that one-way streets and those having a speed limit of 50 km/h were slightly less prevalent in speeding on weekends. Our results can be useful in designing road safety interventions, including publicity campaigns and police enforcement, which aim at reducing speeding behaviours.

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161019 clean _ Speeding weekend weekdays SH CCE - for publication - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 9 October 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 16 October 2019
Keywords: speeding behaviour, weekends, weekdays, speed limits, temporal variation

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 435836
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/435836
ISSN: 0315-1468
PURE UUID: 90a279b2-a446-455e-aea0-e9ef80ec3710

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Nov 2019 17:30
Last modified: 25 Nov 2021 21:26

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Contributors

Author: Shahram Heydari
Author: Luis F. Miranda-Moreno
Author: Liping Fu

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