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Efficient vessel power prediction in operational conditions using machine learning

Efficient vessel power prediction in operational conditions using machine learning
Efficient vessel power prediction in operational conditions using machine learning
It is important to reduce CO 2 emissions. Accurate power prediction of vessels allows evaluation of performance which is essential for this. Neural networks have been shown to accurately predict powering of vessels in weather, which is not straightforward using traditional methods. In previous applications only 6 intuitively relevant variables are used to predict powering with neural networks, including wave height, which is expensive and time consuming to collect. This study investigates the influence of the wave height variable on prediction, concluding that it increases accuracy of prediction by 0.5%. A high frequency dataset from a merchant vessel containing 100 variables is statistically analysed and a maximal subset of variables is derived. This subset is used for principal component analysis, focussing on redundancy. Investigation into the inclusion of non-intuitively relevant variables to increase prediction accuracy for power prediction with a neural network is performed.
power prediction, principal component analysis, artificial neural networks, wave height influence
PRADS
Parkes, A.I.
9fbc0481-7bcf-4d15-8474-4df77d4338ef
Savasta, T.D.
8aea0b48-47bd-4504-bbaa-8e130bd3c42d
Sobey, A.J.
e850606f-aa79-4c99-8682-2cfffda3cd28
Hudson, D.A.
3814e08b-1993-4e78-b5a4-2598c40af8e7
Parkes, A.I.
9fbc0481-7bcf-4d15-8474-4df77d4338ef
Savasta, T.D.
8aea0b48-47bd-4504-bbaa-8e130bd3c42d
Sobey, A.J.
e850606f-aa79-4c99-8682-2cfffda3cd28
Hudson, D.A.
3814e08b-1993-4e78-b5a4-2598c40af8e7

Parkes, A.I., Savasta, T.D., Sobey, A.J. and Hudson, D.A. (2019) Efficient vessel power prediction in operational conditions using machine learning. In The 14th International Symposium on Practical Design of Ships and Other Floating Structures. PRADS..

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

It is important to reduce CO 2 emissions. Accurate power prediction of vessels allows evaluation of performance which is essential for this. Neural networks have been shown to accurately predict powering of vessels in weather, which is not straightforward using traditional methods. In previous applications only 6 intuitively relevant variables are used to predict powering with neural networks, including wave height, which is expensive and time consuming to collect. This study investigates the influence of the wave height variable on prediction, concluding that it increases accuracy of prediction by 0.5%. A high frequency dataset from a merchant vessel containing 100 variables is statistically analysed and a maximal subset of variables is derived. This subset is used for principal component analysis, focussing on redundancy. Investigation into the inclusion of non-intuitively relevant variables to increase prediction accuracy for power prediction with a neural network is performed.

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Published date: September 2019
Keywords: power prediction, principal component analysis, artificial neural networks, wave height influence

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 436026
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/436026
PURE UUID: 13fcb35f-0e7e-4808-83a5-f1fae2d64cd1
ORCID for A.J. Sobey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6880-8338
ORCID for D.A. Hudson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2012-6255

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Date deposited: 26 Nov 2019 17:30
Last modified: 15 Aug 2020 01:37

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