The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Managing online service recovery: procedures, justice and customer satisfaction

Managing online service recovery: procedures, justice and customer satisfaction
Managing online service recovery: procedures, justice and customer satisfaction
Purpose
The internet has changed the way services are delivered and has created new forms of customer-firm interactions. Whilst online service failures remain inevitable, the internet offers opportunities for delivering efficient service recovery through the online channel. Notwithstanding, research evidence on how firms can deliver online service recovery remains scarce. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of two online service recovery strategies – online information and technology-mediated communication – on customer satisfaction, switching and word of mouth intentions.

Design/methodology/approach
A scenario-based experiment is employed. Data are analysed using partial least squares structural equation modelling.

Findings
Online information and technology-mediated interactions can be used as online service recovery strategies. When fair, online service recovery can restore customer satisfaction, lower switching and enhance positive word of mouth. Interactional justice delivered through technology-mediated communication is a strong predictor of satisfaction with online service recovery. Yet, customers in subscription services show greater expectations of online service recovery than those in non-subscription services.

Research limitations/implications
Further research could examine the impact of online service recovery on relational constructs, such as trust. Since customers participate in the online recovery process, future research could investigate the role of customers as co-creators of online service recovery.

Practical implications
Service managers should design online recovery strategies that meet customer need for interactional justice, for example, bespoke e-mails, and virtual chat communications with genuine customer care.

Originality/value
Online information and technology-mediated communication function as online service recovery strategies. Customer perceptions of justice towards online service recovery restore satisfaction, and encourage loyal behaviour.
764-787
Singh, Jaywant
db6316ed-e404-4c5a-873c-6e97c94fe531
Crisafulli, Benedetta
930306a5-4f20-459b-b4a7-180fdda61c8f
Singh, Jaywant
db6316ed-e404-4c5a-873c-6e97c94fe531
Crisafulli, Benedetta
930306a5-4f20-459b-b4a7-180fdda61c8f

Singh, Jaywant and Crisafulli, Benedetta (2016) Managing online service recovery: procedures, justice and customer satisfaction. Journal of Service Theory and Practice, 26 (6), 764-787. (doi:10.1108/JSTP-01-2015-0013).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Purpose
The internet has changed the way services are delivered and has created new forms of customer-firm interactions. Whilst online service failures remain inevitable, the internet offers opportunities for delivering efficient service recovery through the online channel. Notwithstanding, research evidence on how firms can deliver online service recovery remains scarce. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of two online service recovery strategies – online information and technology-mediated communication – on customer satisfaction, switching and word of mouth intentions.

Design/methodology/approach
A scenario-based experiment is employed. Data are analysed using partial least squares structural equation modelling.

Findings
Online information and technology-mediated interactions can be used as online service recovery strategies. When fair, online service recovery can restore customer satisfaction, lower switching and enhance positive word of mouth. Interactional justice delivered through technology-mediated communication is a strong predictor of satisfaction with online service recovery. Yet, customers in subscription services show greater expectations of online service recovery than those in non-subscription services.

Research limitations/implications
Further research could examine the impact of online service recovery on relational constructs, such as trust. Since customers participate in the online recovery process, future research could investigate the role of customers as co-creators of online service recovery.

Practical implications
Service managers should design online recovery strategies that meet customer need for interactional justice, for example, bespoke e-mails, and virtual chat communications with genuine customer care.

Originality/value
Online information and technology-mediated communication function as online service recovery strategies. Customer perceptions of justice towards online service recovery restore satisfaction, and encourage loyal behaviour.

Text
Singh-J-32447 - Accepted Manuscript
Download (554kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 11 September 2015
Published date: 14 November 2016

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 436072
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/436072
PURE UUID: 42f458d8-74a3-4408-8831-a96d2380f07d
ORCID for Jaywant Singh: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0766-0162

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 27 Nov 2019 17:30
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 01:20

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×